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Improving the New Veterans Charter

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Re: Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by Jeffery M on Wed 31 Jul 2013, 23:00

That's so well said Bigrex! It also further contends the fact that disabled Veterans have paid more then their due. We that are disabled, should be undeniably trustworthy with financial independence. We have earned it.

One veteran, One standard

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Re: Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by bigrex on Wed 31 Jul 2013, 18:19

I don't think it's talking about native Vets, but more to do with the governments obligation to the native people as a whole, with treaty rights, land claims etc. basically, they are saying that government has the ubreakable obligation to those individuals that were injured in the defense of our country and upholding the ideals that MP's swore to promote when elected, and that obligation cannot be ignored or changed to meet fiscal constraints. The problem is, too few of todays parliamentarians have served, and of those that have, they do not hold any real power. unlike after WWI and WWII, when almost every MP was a vet. Maybe the country should demand that military or police service be a prerequisite to running for office. After all, how can you be trusted with the lives of others, if you've never had to risk yours for others
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Re: Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by ghillie on Wed 31 Jul 2013, 16:15

Never in my life did I think I would use the word "flabbergasted" but here it is and I truly know what it means. What the hell do they think they are playing at, Jesus, men and women who never questioned the order to throw themselves in the line of danger, are now being treated like it was our idea to get injured. What I do not understand is the difference between native and non native veterans, why is there a sacred obligation to one portion of wounded warriors and not others. Can anyone explain the variance to me, I can not think of one of us who would not ensure the other were treated with the same respect.
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Re: Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by RobbieRoyal on Tue 30 Jul 2013, 11:12

About time stop throwing footballs and dropping pucks show our people the true horrors of sacrifice.
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Re: Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by Teentitan on Tue 30 Jul 2013, 07:47

I have read every blog by the Ombudsman since it's creation and this is the the most sternly written one to date.

He may not be liked by everyone but Guy is serious about bringing LIFE back to the agreed by all parties in 2005 "a living bill"!
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Re: Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by Jeffery M on Mon 29 Jul 2013, 23:41

I don't know what to do with myself! This is un F-ing real! We have been duped!!!!

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Re: Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by Jeffery M on Mon 29 Jul 2013, 23:17

The recognized obligation that protected us as veterans under the Pension Act, is not part of the NVC?!

HOLY HELL! WELL I HOPE SOMEBODY IS $@*&ING LAUGHING! BECAUSE I AS A SEVERLY DISABLE VETERAN AM NOT!!!!!

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Improving the New Veterans Charter

Post by Teentitan on Mon 29 Jul 2013, 18:24

Ottawa – July 29, 2013

I believe that the men and women who serve in the Canadian Forces willingly accept the risks to their health and life that are inherent to military service. If they are injured or become ill and can no longer serve in uniform, the Government of Canada has an unwavering obligation to help them rebuild their lives and restore, to the greatest extent possible, their health, financial independence, and quality of personal and family life. This is a national obligation—a sacred trust between the people of Canada and those who place their lives on the line to protect its interests.

For generations, this was a proud part of the national fabric of our country. In fact, prior to the New Veterans Charter, all previous legislation pertaining to Veterans (e.g. the Pension Act, the Veterans Review and Appeal Board Act, etc.) recognized and confirmed in their preambles this obligation. Unfortunately, this was not included in the New Veterans Charter, probably because of the speed of its unanimous passage in Parliament in May 2005. This needs to be rectified. Otherwise, the moral obligation understood by Canadians, on the part of their government to their Veterans, does not have proper legal authority.

In addition, while there is broad support among parliamentarians, many Veterans' organizations and others for the approach of the New Veterans Charter with its focus on wellness, transition to civilian life, economic financial support and its more holistic approach to addressing the needs of Veterans and their families—as opposed to the Pension Act, which focused on compensation—seven years after its coming into force, there are also profound concerns about the effectiveness of some its programs. I believe that there is an urgent need today for action to address the above-mentioned and other Charter shortcomings that affect Canadian Forces Veterans and their families.

This was brought home to me once again last week when arguments were heard in the Supreme Court of British Columbia on the attempt by six Veterans of the Afghanistan War to launch a class action suit against the Government of Canada concerning perceived inadequacies of the New Veterans Charter. I can understand the frustration of these Veterans. The basis of that frustration is one of the reasons that my office last year began a comprehensive examination of the New Veterans Charter in preparation for the upcoming parliamentary committee hearings this fall on the 2011 enhancements to the Charter.

The first result was the April 2013 release of Improving the New Veterans Charter: The Parliamentary Review. Its purpose is twofold: to focus discussion for this fall’s parliamentary committee review of the enhancements to the New Veterans Charter that resulted from the coming into force of the Enhanced New Veterans Charter Act on October 3, 2011; and to act as a catalyst to broaden the review of the New Veterans Charter.

The report focuses on three key transition issues: financial instability and decreased standard of living caused by reduced post-release income and insufficient financial support after age 65; limitations in vocational rehabilitation and assistance support, which can affect second career aspirations and employment options; and difficult family environment situations due to insufficient family support.

I placed focus on these issues because after analyzing over 200 recommendations for improvements to the New Veterans Charter proposed in various reports since 2006; I found that 145 of them concentrated on these three key transition issues. I believe that they need to be addressed urgently because they affect a Veteran throughout his or her life.

The recommendations needed to address these issues are now being finalized by my office. They will appear in an upcoming report to be released at the end of the summer. At that time, the issue of the adequacy of the Disability Award will be addressed. As with all my reports and recommendations, it will be evidenced-based and, for the first time, accompanied by an actuarial analysis that will highlight shortcomings of the New Veterans Charter in meeting the financial needs of Veterans.

There is still much to do to improve the lives of many of our Veterans. I appreciate your continued support and guidance and always welcome your comments and suggestions.

Guy

Amélioration de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants
Ottawa – le 29 juillet 2013

À mon avis, les hommes et les femmes qui servent dans les Forces canadiennes acceptent de leur plein gré de mettre leur vie et leur santé en péril, un risque qui est inhérent au service militaire. S’ils sont blessés ou tombent malades et qu’ils ne peuvent plus porter l’uniforme, le gouvernement du Canada a l’obligation inébranlable de les aider à rebâtir leur vie et, dans toute la mesure du possible, à retrouver la santé, l’indépendance financière et une vie personnelle et familiale de qualité. Il s’agit d’une obligation nationale—une mission sacrée que s’est vu confier le peuple du Canada à l’égard de ceux et celles qui risquent leur vie pour protéger les intérêts du Canada.

Pendant des générations, cette obligation a fait partie du tissu de notre pays. En effet, avant l’entrée en vigueur de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants, toutes les lois concernant les vétérans (par exemple, la Loi sur les pensions et la Loi sur le Tribunal des anciens combattants (révision et appel)) la reconnaissaient et la confirmaient dans leur préambule. Malheureusement, elle n’a pas été incluse dans la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants, probablement à cause de la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été adoptée à l’unanimité par le Parlement en mai 2005. Il faut corriger cette situation. Sinon, l’obligation morale du gouvernement à l’égard des vétérans, telle qu’elle est comprise par les Canadiens et les Canadiennes, n’a pas l’autorité légale.

De plus, bien que les parlementaires, bon nombre d’organisations de vétérans et d’autres appuient largement la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants, qui se concentre sur le bien-être, la transition à la vie civile et le soutien financier lié à des répercussions financières et qui prévoit une approche plus globale pour répondre aux besoins des vétérans et de leur famille—par opposition à la Loi sur les pensions, qui se concentre sur l’indemnisation—sept ans après son entrée en vigueur, il existe des préoccupations au sujet de l’efficacité de certains de ses programmes. J’estime qu’à l’heure actuelle, il y a un besoin urgent de corriger ces problèmes ainsi que les autres lacunes affectant les vétérans des Forces canadiennes et leur famille.

La semaine dernière, j’ai de nouveau compris ce besoin urgent, quand j’ai pris connaissance des arguments qui ont été présentés à la Cour suprême de la Colombie-Britannique relativement à la demande de recours collectif contre le gouvernement du Canada faite par six vétérans de la guerre en Afghanistan qui prétendent que la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants est inadéquate. Je comprends la frustration de ces vétérans. La source de cette frustration est l’une des raisons pour lesquelles mon bureau a entamé l’année dernière un examen approfondi de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants en prévision des audiences du comité parlementaire de cet automne sur les améliorations apportées à la Charte en 2011.

Le premier résultat de cet examen a été la diffusion, en avril 2013, du rapport intitulé Amélioration de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants : l’examen parlementaire. Le rapport a deux objectifs : stimuler la discussion sur l’examen, qui sera effectué cet automne par un comité parlementaire, des améliorations apportées à la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants grâce à l’entrée en vigueur du projet de la Loi améliorant la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants le 3 octobre 2011; et faire élargir l’examen de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants.

Le rapport se penche sur trois problèmes clés en matière de transition : l’instabilité financière et un niveau de vie inférieur en raison d’un revenu inférieur après la libération et d’un soutien financier insuffisant après l’âge de 65 ans; les limitations sur le plan des programmes de réadaptation et d’assistance professionnelles pouvant affecter les aspirations de seconde carrière et les possibilités d’emploi; une situation familiale difficile en raison d’un soutien insuffisant aux familles.

J’ai choisi de me concentrer sur ces problèmes après avoir analysé les quelque 200 améliorations à la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants recommandées dans divers rapports publiés depuis 2006; j’ai trouvé que 145 d’entre elles visaient ces trois problèmes clés en matière de transition. Je crois qu’il faut régler ces problèmes rapidement parce qu’ils risquent de nuire à un vétéran tout au long de sa vie.

Les recommandations nécessaires pour régler ces problèmes sont en train d’être mises au point par mon bureau. Elles seront publiées dans un rapport qui sera diffusé à la fin de l’été. La question du caractère suffisant de l’indemnité d’invalidité sera abordée à ce moment-là. Comme c’est le cas avec tous mes rapports et toutes mes recommandations, le rapport sera fondé sur des données probantes et, pour la première fois, il sera accompagné d’une analyse actuarielle qui mettra en relief les lacunes de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants en ce qui concerne la satisfaction des besoins financiers des vétérans.

Il y a encore beaucoup à faire pour améliorer la vie de bon nombre de nos vétérans. Je vous remercie de votre soutien et de vos conseils continus, et je vous assure que vos commentaires et suggestions sont toujours les bienvenus.

Guy
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