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What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Ex Member on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 17:22

nav danny thanks for voting guys . it truly is the pinnacle of freedom of speech.

propat

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Dannypaj on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 16:07

I voted today in support of veterans. Veterans fighting for benefits became a ballot box issue, so my vote today was in support of veterans.
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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Guest on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 14:51

I voted today in the advance poll and I voted liberal! Almost everyone I've talked to at the legion is voting the same ......because....the liberals have hands down the best veterans platform .....enough said!

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Rifleman on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 12:56

I to have played silly fracker in the same grounds you have propat and yep it sucked and I agree high ground is the answer

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Guest on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 11:48

ya see after about a decade of fighting from the swamps individual vets from all over the country can come together and solve what is by far the worst problem with the NVC in one day where all others have failed . yup even if trudeau isn't on the level the least the VERY LEAST we will achieve is taking the high ground . much better to fight from the high ground than a fracking swamp . did a lot of time in the gagetown training area and as a lot of you must know fighting from a swamp just fracking sucks .

propat

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Guest on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 11:36

well buds JT says he will do just that or at least it seems that way so ill give him all the rope he needs . he will either fix the problem with it or hang himself with it . none of us are mind readers and can tell what he will do for sure . all we can do is vote hope and prepare for the fight that may very well come.

thing is after almost a decade of herring this will never happen it will be more impactful and media friendly to be having this fight with a party that promised this would happen than with one that said it never would.

propat

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Guest on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 11:03

Propat that is the first thing that has to be addressed. All advocates have to hit the goc after the election with teeth bared or stay home, If their just going there to mingle they are wasting space and time for those who are actually trying to right a wrong.

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Guest on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 10:26

boys lots of complicated problems because people made them that way .

a lot of the solutions are easy .

I have a long list save for one they are a bit hard to prioritize until one is resolved .

so I will only mention one at this time .

END THE BUYOUT NOW !!!!!!!

seriously if this happens a lot of the other problems will either disappear altogether or be minimised to various extents allowing for a more rational and equitable look at the other issues to prioritize and deal with them in the appropriate manner .


the fight to have this done will not end after this election but until it actually gets done.

END THE BUYOUT NOW !!!!!!!

propat


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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Guest on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 10:23

Want trust. They can start this by ensuring all medically released receive financial support without having to jump through buracratic hoopes of any kind. trying to talk to some one who is making demands and forcing policy down your throat causes defensive reactions and suspicion. they have to earn veterans trust then programs will be accepted more readily without feeling like there is a political agenda. EXCELLENT POST WICE...

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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by Riddick on Mon 12 Oct 2015, 09:10

I believe this has been said before...but to reiterate.....

Additional support staff is needed along with programs but vets need more money period! Having to fight for scraps is hard enough on us......it's down-right degrading. Many live in poverty or close to it and not all associated expenses are covered. To barely survive financially is not quality of life. Many vets still count on their income to support or help support their families and bread crumbs just does not cut it!

More financial support for our spouses/caregivers who do so much and is hardly recognized by VAC/MVA or the dreaded Conservative government.

As far as what is fair..... a panel will be needed for that...... a fair panel that can say what the average Canadian household receives and or what the average civilian receives for the same injury (compensation to vets must be increased and not just for the 1 or 2%). Many vets have lost so much protecting this country be it, self-esteem, physical and or mental abilities. Being able to spend quality time with our families is therapy many don't understand. How many vets are financially able to take their loved ones on a yearly vacation.....lmfao.......how many MP's can!!!!!! how many vets can take their families out for dinner or have company over when they live in a shoe box???? Not a problem for MP's........ how many vets fought for their country for selfish reasons!!! NONE!! How many MP's want the easy life....for life???? everyone of them!!!!!

Veterans are bitter and the way we have been treated or lack of and rightfully so. We want our dignity back please and thank you.....we earned it!

Riddick
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Re: What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by johnny211 on Sun 11 Oct 2015, 17:14

Hi VVice - I will start of by saying welcome. As one of those older, well in his 50's Vet my list may be different from others, and maybe not. I have knowledge of both the old PA, and the NVC, as I am under both. I am TPI, and by no means has the process to get there this past year and a half been an easy rd. It was a frustrating redtape road at times. I am not saying it should ever be a handout TPI. If a Vet is at the pt of TPI, he/she has suffered alot physically and mentally and should be well looked after by VAC.
So to what I would like to see passed into policy by whatever party gets in;

- CPP, CCPD and CF pension amounts, should not be taken off ELB/EELB;
- ELB/EELB should go from 70-90% or even 100% of retirement wage;
- The PIA/PIAS process needs to be reworked/Combined into one allowance;
- CM -They are now way overworked, with too many Vets to look after. They are
burnt out. So we need more CM in every area of the country;
- District Office's - All that closed , need to be reopened;
- Claim wait times have to get back under 16wks (my last was 24wks);
- A TPI'd Vet should not have to prove every couple of yrs that they are still TPI(This
is a waste of time/resources as almost all will not improve;
- VAC "My Vac Account" needs alot of improvement, and questions you ask in there
should not take anymore than 1 day to get an answer;

They are alot of others, but that is my list. Thanks for asking, VVV..
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What the Politicians Have Said and Can We Trust Them

Post by VVice on Sun 11 Oct 2015, 15:34



"Merda taurorum animas conturbit" (Bullshit baffles brains)

http://www.willyoubetricked.ca (Conservative website for 2008 Election)

With less than two weeks until voters decided which party will form the next government, it is time to consider specifically what each has stated that it will do for the Veterans Community. This article will concentrate on just the Liberals and the New Democrats as most of us know by now what the Conservatives have done or not...
“What you always remember when you meet a Canadian veteran is that everything that we have in this country was earned. And those men and women went out and put their lives on the line for this country. Never forget what they contributed. But more important, never forget how precious it is—how precious what we have is.” Prime Minister Stephen Harper (in a TV commercial prior to the 2008 Election)
This statement seems to echo the sentiments expressed by Prime Minister Robert Borden during WW1. Canadians now know that after the federal government spent more than $700,000 arguing in court that the social contract was not binding, and that VAC did not invest about $1 billion after Mr Harper became prime minister, that Mr Harper does not truly respect what Veterans did for Canada.
We want to emphasise that Veterans' issues have become an important part of federal elections. This shows that all political parties realise that the Veterans Community can not be ignored. Veterans can be very influential in the development and management of federal legislation, policy and services. Thus it is important to ensure that the politicians make good on their commitments and also treat the Veterans Community with dignity and respect.
After you read this article and the attachments, we encourage you to comment on the CSAT forum. Please leave your lists of commitments that you want the next government to enact.
The two above mentioned parties are the most likely to gain enough seats to form a government, or failing that, possibly agree to a coalition if for no other reason than to ensure Stephen Harper does not remain our Prime Minister.
All the polls seem to suggest that the final result will be difficult to predict as all three parties have about the same level of decided support. The “swing vote” will decide which party is victorious. It may be influenced by the “anything but conservative” (ABC) faction or the same voters who voted for the Conservatives in 2008 and 2011.
Rather than paraphrasing or interpreting what the Liberals and New Democrats have stated, we encourage you, the reader, to study the published material (party platform) of the two parties. These are attached to this article.
One additional statement from the Liberal Party is included here because it bears directly on a landmark legal case. This is the Equitas case which seeks to clarify the responsibilities of Canada to its Veterans Community.
33. A Social Covenant with Canadian Veterans
WHEREAS, successive generations of Canadians have served their country honourably as members of the Canadian Armed Forces;
WHEREAS, service in the Canadian Armed Forces requires members to make a personal commitment to put their lives on the line on behalf of their fellow citizens, and to risk their lives anywhere in the world that the nation deems it appropriate that they do so;
WHAREAS, the burden associated with military service is not only borne by those in the Canadian military, but also by their families, who make untold sacrifices to help ensure the success of Canadian Armed Forces missions;
WHEREAS, the Conservative government’s approach to veterans’ policy demonstrates an utter disregard for our country’s social covenant with those who serve in the military, particularly through its aggressive funding cuts to the supports and services that veterans need;
BE IT RESOLVED THAT a future Liberal government will uphold the principles of this social covenant in its defence and veterans policies, and will live up to our country’s sacred obligation to care for veterans and their families throughout their lives by allowing them to maintain a quality of life that is worthy of the sacrifices that they have made for Canada;
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT a future Liberal government will introduce legislation to strengthen the New Veterans Charter to reflect this commitment.
We believe that the social contract or covenant must be enshrined in legislation so that no future government can attempt to shirk its responsibilities as was attempted by the Conservative government in recent years. This is only fair given that Veterans must commit to the professional military tenet of “unlimited liability” (completing a mission above all else including the giving of one’s life). This is a requirement unique to the CF as it is not binding on any other part of the federal civil service. The concept of unlimited liability separates Veterans from all other Canadians.
All parties must abide by the terms of the contract or face penalties, usually determined by a court of law. Canada recognises verbal as well as informal contracts (a handshake deal) such as the one stated by Prime Minister Borden in WW1. His intent has been open to too much interpretation and the federal government decided to improve its treatment of Veterans by developing and enacting legislation in 1944, which forms the basis of the “Old Veterans Charter” (OVC). This was necessary because the government knew that it had not fully honoured the sacrifices of the Veterans of WW1 and wanted to correct its mistakes.
What has confused Veterans and other Canadians is VAC's poor understanding of the OVC such that the department felt that a new charter was required for modern Veterans. The most crucial bit of confused information was that the OVC was something for disabled Veterans. Therefore, VAC decided to inject “wellness” ideas into the NVC.
Anyone who takes the time to actually read the OVC will realise that ALL Veterans could benefit from it.
The biggest problem was not with the legislation but with those responsible for its implementation. There were plenty of bureaucrats ready to re-interpret how the OVC should be implemented. Support for Veterans must be more than just adequate and should be life long.
We strongly urge the next Minister of Veterans Affairs as well as the next Minister of National Defence to compare the OVC and the NVC. There is a handy matrix on this website, which highlights the differences. The government must ensure that every Veteran is afforded stability, security and quality of life.
The worst mistake the next government can make with regards to the Veterans Community is to allow the NVC to remain as it is now. It has to be either significantly altered or scrapped. Both charters should contain the same basic entitlements, otherwise the Veterans Community will continue to suffer inequality contrary to the concept of “one Veteran, one standard”.
We recommend that the two be merged so that there is only one charter for all Veterans.
In addition to a thorough review of the OVC, NVC and the operations of VAC, we recommend that many of the immoral portions of Veterans legislation be removed. These include such things as the marriage clause restricting benefits for marriages of Veterans after the age of 60, and caveats like “up to age 65” or “after age 65” should be expunged from all legislation. There are lots of these clauses, which are contrary to Canadian rights and laws.
Sadly, the most glaring omission in our opinion in the below political platforms is the lack of any spousal or dependant support for family members who must provide 24/7 care for Veterans. During the last meeting between VAC and the Veterans Community on 14 April, 2015, many dependants and their Veterans spoke about the financial hardships experienced because a family member must stop working to become a full-time care giver.
The current program Family Caregiver Relief Benefit (FCRB) is not income replacement.
Fact, an MP earns a base salary of $167,400 in 2015. This is well above the average Canadian family's total income. MP's also receive additional benefits to cover expenses related to their duties. Surely, Veterans deserve a bit more consideration than the entry level of about $45,000 for annual benefits or typical lump sum payment, which is usually below $50,000, for life.
One other recommendation to be considered is a change to the Terms of Service for the Canadian Forces. If MP's can qualify for pensions after serving six years, then so should Veterans. In addition, the guaranteed annual benefits of disabled Veterans should be increased so that they are comparable to an average household income regardless of length of service. The sum total of all financial support should be based on the current average Canadian household income, potential future earnings and not just a percentage of the Veteran's CF salary, particularly for young Veterans, who have only served a few years or less.
It is our responsibility to ensure that we get steak instead a “lot of baloney”. A smart shopper understands the concept of “caveat emptor” (let the buyer beware) to avoid buyer's remorse. So consider the various political commitments and determine if they are “non gradus anus rodentum” (Not worth a rat's ass).
On Thursday, 24 September, 2015 the NDP published the following:

We are pleased to be able to share with you Tom Mulcair's commitment to a New Veterans Charter to better serve veterans and their families. An NDP government would reverse the Conservatives' disrespect of Canadian veterans with investments to enhance support and improve medical care for Canada's veterans and their families.

After nine years of Conservative governments, too many veterans and their families still cannot access adequate health care, pensions and other vital supports. The closure of nine Veterans Affairs offices, and the elimination of 900 jobs at Veterans Affairs (23% of the workforce) have made it more difficult for veterans to receive front line services. Since 2006, the amount of money that was budgeted for Veterans Affairs and then redirected to other government priorities is $1.13 billion.
 
An NDP government will support Canadian veterans and their families with a $454 million investment over four years: to provide better treatment for veterans with post-traumatic stress and mental health issues; to enhance long-term care and expand the Veterans Independence Program; and to increase survivors' pensions and ensure funding is in place to support dignified funerals for veterans through the Last Post Program.
 
It's time for a new era in the government's relationship with veterans – one based on respect that ensures dignity, financial security, and quality care for life. A New Democrat government will make sure all veterans have the income supports they need.
 
We will work with veterans to review, update and improve the New Veterans Charter, including addressing the issue of lump-sum payments currently offered to seriously injured veterans.  We will put in place a "One Veteran, One Standard” policy that ensures all veterans are treated equally, regardless of when or where they served. We will increase veterans' survivors' pensions and remove the archaic marriage clause restricting benefits for marriages that occur after age 60.
 
Ensuring timely, accessible care for veterans' health and well-being will be a priority for an NDP government. To do this we will improve and expand efforts to give those suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or other mental health issues the support they need. The NDP will re-open the 9 Veterans Affairs offices that were closed by the Conservatives to ensure that veterans can access the front-line services they rely on in their own communities.

We will reverse the cuts to long-term care for veterans and expand the Veterans Independence Program to allow seriously injured and elderly Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP veterans to continue to live at home.

 To ensure that services are delivered with a veterans-first approach we will eliminate the Veterans Review and Appeal Board, which is staffed by appointees who have often been unresponsive to the realities faced by veterans seeking disability benefits. We will replace it with a medically-focused peer review process for appeals. The powers of the Veterans Ombudsman will be expanded.

You can count on the NDP to stand up for veterans and their families.

The following information was copied from CTV News on 10 October 2015

(http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/election/platforms/military-and-veterans-affairs-1.2597660)

CPC Summary

By 2020, add 665 personnel to Canada's special operation forces, which consists of 1,900 members.

Re-establish College Militaire Royal (CMR) as a full-fledged, degree-granting military university.
Issue official veterans cards as formal proof of service to every member of the military who completes basic training and is honourably released.
Establish a Canadian Forces reserve unit in the Yukon, the first such unit in the territory since the Yukon Regiment was disbanded in 1968.
Add 6,000 people to the ranks of the Canadian Forces reserves at a cost of $163 million over three years and $63.4 million going forward once the target of 30,000 personnel is reached.
Improve the earnings loss benefit for veterans with service-related disabilities or injuries by letting them earn up to $10,000 in outside work, without losing any government funding.
Spend $454 million over four years to provide treatment for veterans suffering from the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder.
Conservative Leader Stephen Harper said Canada’s fight against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria must continue in order to contain the terror threat.
Harper has said that Canada will continue its participation in Operation Reassurance until June 2016. The mission is aimed at supporting countries which fear Russian interference, including Ukraine.

NDP Summary

End Canadian participation in the bombing campaign against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria.
Leader Tom Mulcair has said that, under his government, Canada would continue the current training mission in Ukraine.
Spend $454 million over four years to provide treatment for veterans suffering from the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder.
Improve long-term care services and the Veterans Independence Program, which provides housekeeping and other support to elderly and disabled former military personnel.
Re-open regional Veterans Affairs offices that were closed across the country.

LPC Summary

Scrap the purchase of the F-35 fighter jet and instead buy cheaper planes to replace the aging CF-18s and use the savings to pay for offshore Arctic patrol vessels for the navy being built in Halifax.
$300 million a year to reform veterans' benefits and delivery of services to vets.
Bring back lifelong pensions for injured vets.
Hire an additional 400 veterans case workers to restore positions cut by Conservative budgets and re-open closed Veterans Affairs offices.
Pull back on Canada’s involvement in anti-ISIS combat mission, but continue training local troops to fight the militants.
Before the writ was dropped, Leader Justin Trudeau said that Canada “has a vital role” to play in helping to end the conflict in eastern Ukraine. The Liberals have also expressed their support for Ukraine in its fight against Russian aggression.

GPC Summary

Improve benefits for veterans and roll back cuts to Veterans Affairs.
Provide any veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder a service dog if they want one.
Leader Elizabeth May has said that “it’s not useful to bomb the Islamic State” because that’s not the only reason Syria has been devastated and it won’t stop the Syrian refugee tide.


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