Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

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Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Ex Member on Thu 18 Oct 2012, 00:12

Smoke- em if you got-em, Boys and Girls. This case is not  over yet.

Dealing with sisip,  over the last five years would drive anyone to smoke.

http://www.cannabisculture.com/content/canada-pay-military-veterans-medical-marijuana

The military may strictly forbid marijuana use by its soldiers, but the federal government has decided to pay for medical cannabis for some veterans.

Veterans Affairs has reversed a previous ban, now saying it "may provide payment in relation to the associated costs of medically required marijuana to clients who have qualified."

Payments can be made only to veterans licensed by Health Canada to possess medical marijuana, and who buy government-certified cannabis produced on contract by a firm in Flin Flon, Man.

The policy change was approved last October, but is only now being communicated to veterans who require the product for pain management and other severe medical conditions.


http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/drugs-alcohol/5-common-uses-of-medical-cannabis5.htm

In addition to the reported effects of relaxation and pain reduction, many users of medicinal cannabis also use the substance as a means to relieve anxiety and certain sleep disorders such as insomnia. According to the National Cancer Institute,studies testing the effectiveness of cannabis showed that test subjects who inhaled marijuana had "improved mood, improved sense of well-being and less anxiety[/color]." Additionally, patients who ingested a cannabis plant extract spray (administered under the tongue) reported more restful sleep [source: National Cancer Institute].


Last edited by abetterway on Thu 18 Oct 2012, 00:53; edited 1 time in total

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Report spurs call to study marijuana’s potential in opioid-crisis fight

Post by Guest on Fri 13 Jan 2017, 06:08



Report spurs call to study marijuana’s potential in opioid-crisis fight

MIKE HAGER
VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017 9:54PM EST
Last updated Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017 9:54PM EST

A new U.S. government-funded report showing clear evidence cannabis is an effective remedy for those with chronic pain underscores the need for more research into how marijuana can help fight the deadly opioid crisis ravaging North America, according to one of Canada’s leading pain researchers.

A report released Thursday by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine outlined nearly 100 conclusions about the benefits and harms of cannabis on a range of public health and safety issues. Drawing on studies published since 1999, the report by the federal advisory panel stated that marijuana can almost certainly ease chronic pain and might help some people sleep, but it may also raise the risk of developing schizophrenia and trigger heart attacks.

It ended with a call for more scientific information about cannabis so that health-care professionals and policy makers can make sound decisions because the current lack of evidence “poses a public health risk.”

Mark Ware, a McGill pain researcher and vice-chair of Canada’s recent federal panel on marijuana legalization, said one of the biggest takeaways from the new report, which he reviewed before publication, is that new research must now be funded to see whether cannabis can pare down the use of some opioids, a class of legal and illicit painkillers that has led to an ongoing crisis that has killed hundreds of Canadians over the past year.

“So far it’s an association that’s been reported on between states that have legalized cannabis and reductions in opioid mortality and use of other medications,” Dr. Ware said in a telephone interview Thursday. “How can the medical cannabis sphere overlap with the opioid epidemic?

“Those associations need to be explored urgently.”

Last year, data from Veterans Affairs showed fewer Canadian veterans have sought prescription opioids and tranquilizers in recent years, while at the same time prescriptions for medical marijuana have skyrocketed.

Jeff Blackmer, vice-president of medical professionalism at the Canadian Medical Association, echoed Dr. Ware’s call for more research into the subject, noting federal funding into more cannabis research in general is expected after the Liberals introduce legislation legalizing the drug this spring.

“There’s a lot of discussion about the substitution therapy [of cannabis for opioids] and, again, the challenge for physicians is: There is no evidence or very little evidence,” said Dr. Blackmer.

Dr. Blackmer, who works half a day each week at the Ottawa Rehabilitation Centre treating people with spinal-cord injuries and multiple sclerosis, said at least half of his patients have asked him for a marijuana prescription. He said he rarely prescribes cannabis because he has a host of concerns about the lack of evidence surrounding the drug, including how it could react with other medications and its effect on driving.

For marijuana users or those considering it, “there’s very little to guide them” on amounts and health risks, said Dr. Marie McCormick of the Harvard School of Public Health, who headed the committee behind the report.

Committee members cautioned that most conclusions are based on statistical links between use and health, rather than direct demonstrations of cause and effect.

The review found strong evidence that marijuana and similar compounds ease nausea from chemotherapy, with varying degrees of evidence for treating muscle stiffness and spasms in multiple sclerosis.

Limited evidence says marijuana and its chemical analogues can boost appetite in people with HIV or AIDS, and ease symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, the report concluded. But it said there’s not enough research to say whether they’re effective for treating cancers, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy or certain symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, or helping people beat addictions.

Turning to potential harms, the committee concluded strong evidence links marijuana use to the risk of developing schizophrenia and other causes of psychosis, with the highest risk among the most frequent users.

There is a strong indication that using marijuana before driving increases the risk of a traffic accident, but no clear link to workplace accidents or injuries, or death from a marijuana overdose. There is limited evidence for the idea that it hurts school achievement, raises unemployment rates or harms social functioning.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/pot-good-for-chronic-pain-but-more-research-needed-into-helping-with-opioid-crisis-report/article33613964/

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Re: Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Vet1234 on Fri 13 Jan 2017, 19:02

Anyone here ever get frustrated with their LPs strain choices?
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Re: Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Dannypaj on Sat 14 Jan 2017, 06:42

I am with Cannimed.  No problems with them, even navigating through this B.S new MMJ policy imposed on us.
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Re: Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Vet1234 on Sat 14 Jan 2017, 12:11

I'm with MedReleaf and Aphria.
MedReleaf blows Aphria away in my opinion.
Pricey, but strain selection and availability is far superior.
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Re: Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Teentitan on Sat 14 Jan 2017, 13:21

Do any of these companies sell the MM Oil or pills for pain?
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Re: Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Rifleman on Sat 14 Jan 2017, 13:45

Yes teen go to medreleaf web page they have oil and pills when you order it it comes out of your monthly allotment oil is really good especially for sleep apnoea

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Re: Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Vet1234 on Sat 14 Jan 2017, 15:15

Has anyone here ever switched LPs? I'm switching LPs but not increasing my dosage.
Does that still require BlueCross approval? I was already approved my dosage, i split it between 2 LPs to see what I liked. I've decided to move it all to a single LP. I'm hoping it's not that complicated.
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Re: Canada to Pay for Military Veterans Medical Marijuana

Post by Dannypaj on Sat 14 Jan 2017, 18:40

Cannimed sells MMJ oil and has a websites as well showcasing all their products.

https://www.cannimed.ca/
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