Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by bosn181 on Sun 12 Mar 2017, 16:55

thats the thing they want you to come in drink play bingo and gamble so many injured vets suffer from addictions and last place they need to be is a place that only wants to you spend money on things you struggled with to give up while looking for answers that made you fall into this downward spiral they don't want u to just come in and be social they care about the bottom line how can they get whats in your pocket in to there balance sheet.

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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Guest on Sun 12 Mar 2017, 19:12

I agree with you all, and I would think a lot of the problems their facing comes from within.

When an organization refuses to show their expenses, they are putting their heads down and admitting corruption.

No president of any Legion should be a civie, period. I can certainly see some civilians put in for some admin, and I can also see the need for civilian members, but voting has to be left to Veterans only. The Legion needs to be run by Veterans and an outside oversight department needs to be put in place for all accountability.

I think like most here said, the Legion is fading, and I also agree the government should step in and change or induce change of making a complete overhaul of all Legions.
As it stands today, the Legion has a best friend, the government, and the poppy funds collected, are collected by the Legions across our Country which makes the Legion look good in front of the government and the general population.

That said, I'm sure there's good Legions out there, and also some good Veterans who are members of the Legion, but I don't think that in itself would save the Legions reputation, and perhaps the downward spiral to becoming non existent. JMO

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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Teentitan on Sun 12 Mar 2017, 22:34

Trooper no gov't would ever step in and change or overhaul the Legion. It's not their job.

BUT the gov't can let them know by stopping Legion Service Officers from accessing veteran's files on VAC's DSN server. Stop inviting them to meetings and have CRA audit their charity status. The Legion would have a batch of kittens over the last one.

All that said above until the veterans who are Legion members scream at the top of their lungs, go on tv, letters to the editors at HOW veterans are actually being ignored by the now, IMO, Legion Social Club things within the Legion will not change.
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Questions over future role of Legions

Post by Guest on Mon 13 Mar 2017, 14:55

Questions over future role of Legions


Bill Tierney

March 13, 2017


Members of the 234 Legion hoist their flags aloft. Veterans and members of several military units gather at the Dorval Cenotaph to celebrate the anniversary of the Battle of Britain in September 2007.

I was thinking about the role of the Royal Canadian Legions in our towns. What do they do for our communities? Do they still serve or help veterans?

Some people think the Legions should just die out with the generation of soldiers who came ashore in Normandy. They’ve served their purpose. We beat Hitler. We survived the peace, more or less.

Even Legion people can sound negative about the future. I had just received an emotional and sad response to a couple of columns I wrote about Montreal withdrawing tax exemptions from local Legions. This veteran was writing from New Brunswick. He told the story of his Montreal father, Bill Glover, who was a World War II veteran with several medals to his credit, including a Member of the Order of the British Empire.

Glover ran the bar and was treasurer for years at the Otterburn Park Legion. The Legion was central to his family. Right up to his death, he was a Legion man and a major volunteer in his community. You would recognize the type. They were as confident and courageous as the type of warfare they practised.

Now the veteran writing to me, his son, had also been in the military before the Afghanistan conflict with three overseas tours of duty to his credit. He does not think that the Royal Canadian Legion today is the same as it was for his father.

“Never,” he writes, “has the Royal Canadian Legion been a place for me. It never helped with my (post-traumatic stress disorder) PTSD and never will they see me cross their steps; don’t ever say that they’ve fought for the current veterans.”

I didn’t know what to write back. I don’t know what he would be looking for at his Legion. The Legion hall is obviously not a place of comfort for this veteran.

“How can I feel comfort in a place which holds more civilians than service members?” asks my New Brunswick veteran. He remembers his father’s Legion. “They stood for something,” he says. “This is not the same Legion my grandfather had.”

Now he’s undoubtedly right: the Legion has changed because the thousands of servicemen and women who populated them have died. It isn’t even the same Legion I remember joining as a civilian in the 1990s.

I joined for mixed reasons: the Legion had local political clout. There were a lot of local residents who were also members of the Legion. But I stayed in the Legion because I loved people like Jimmy Horan who lived just round the corner, a completely bilingual Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue resident, proudly Irish by descent, very kind, very connected to life on our streets.

Our Legion was full of men and women like Horan and over the next 20 years that World War II generation slowly slipped away, one by one. They’d get sick and then move into the Ste. Anne veterans’ hospital where I’d visit them with my students from John Abbott College and then they’d die as thousands of military souls had died on that ground before them.

The next wave of military which found its way to our Legion was much more specialized, not the result of a World War conscription process. The new veterans did not come in battalions: they came in very small groups, often associated with treatment for PTSD at Ste-Anne’s hospital, which was the last veterans’ hospital managed by Ottawa. Like Lionel Desmond, the young Nova Scotia soldier who recently committed suicide after killing his wife, mother and daughter in Upper Tracadie, Nova Scotia. Desmond was traumatized by his military experience and spent eight weeks at Ste-Anne’s hospital being treated last summer for PTSD. He was even invited to an employee’s home and spent evenings in our Legion. I was chatting about him with the president of the Legion, Kevin McCready, who is the service officer.

It is a service officer’s responsibility to find solutions for veterans in need. Every Legion has a service officer. McCready says the Legion can reach out to wounded servicemen, but there just aren’t enough resources.

Camille Raymond, a Ste-Anne city council member in the 1980s, is a Legion man whose son had gone out with the first Reservists to Yugoslavia and come back with a life-altering case of PTSD.

So, tell me, what is left for other victims of military trauma at the hospital in Ste-Anne? Ten beds for two months of treatment at a time? And what happened to Desmond at that the hospital in Antigonish, where they couldn’t find a way to calm him down before he brought catastrophe on his family?

Are there enough resources to care for all the PTSD victims coming back from our so-called peace-keeping missions? Are our political masters taking this seriously enough? What happened to Lionel Desmond that he was allowed to get so desperate?

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/west-island-gazette/bill-tierney-questions-over-future-role-of-legions

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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Teentitan on Mon 13 Mar 2017, 22:53

WOW! Hope the Legion is wearing their cup cause that was the swiftest, hardest kick to the groin they have ever taken!
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Advocating for Life-long Financial Security for Canada’s Ill and Injured Veterans

Post by Guest on Tue 28 Mar 2017, 12:45

March 14, 2017

Advocating for Life-long Financial Security for Canada’s Ill and Injured Veterans




Canadians are hearing more and more about the deep gaps in care and benefits for Veterans. At the forefront of discussion is the New Veterans Charter, a set of benefits adopted in 2006 without clause-by-clause review in Parliamentary Committee and in the Senate because of a perceived view that the Pension Act did not meet the modern needs of many injured and ill Veterans. For many, the Disability Pension did not provide enough for the basic necessities, and the Pension Act did not adequately look after ill and injured Veterans and their families or facilitate their transition to civilian life.

When the New Veterans Charter (NVC) was established, replacing the Pension Act, it brought a holistic approach to Veterans’ care and benefits. The NVC offered a number of benefits that the Pension Act did not provide including additional financial benefits, disability benefits, rehabilitation services, health services, education assistance, and job placement assistance to address not only financial support, but also continuing care and quality of life. However, the NVC did not come without its faults.

When the NVC was introduced, the Legion, as part of a multidisciplinary group which included representatives from other Veterans’ organizations, medical specialists, government, the Canadian Armed Forces and others was invited to participate in the New Veterans Charter working group. The Legion was behind the New Veterans Charter because it was promised that the charter would be a “living charter” which could be amended as flaws or gaps were identified. Once the Charter was adopted, the New Veterans Charter Advisory Group was formed to help identify issues and make recommendations to the Senate and Parliamentary Committee on gaps in care and benefits. Recommendations for change were identified early on, yet, despite assurances the Charter would be amended as gaps were identified, the government left it neglected for five years before making the first amendment. Progress has been excruciatingly slow since, and now we see the massive holes left as our Veterans return from conflicts in dire need of support.

The men and women who serve our country sign up voluntarily, knowing the risks and dangers of the job. The government has an obligation to ensure all who served, and their families, are cared for. There are significant and critical faults in the NVC that must be addressed for Canada’s Veterans. Of particular concern is the need for lifelong financial security for ill and injured Veterans. Some Veterans have been calling to abolish the New Veterans Charter all together, and reinstate the Pension Act with its Disability Pension. While some argue the Pension Act and the Disability Pension provided more financial compensation and stability than the New Veterans Charter, the Legion disagrees.

It is the Legion’s position that there are significant benefits in the New Veterans Charter
that focus on quality of life that were not provided through the Pension Act,
and that there are better options for life-long financial security
than simply re-instating the Disability Pension.

Comparing the Pension Act with the New Veterans Charter

Comparisons continue to be made between the Disability Award (sometimes referred to as the lump sum payment) paid out under the New Veterans Charter and the monthly Disability Pension paid out under the Pension Act. At the core of the comparison, the old Disability Pension appears to provide greater compensation and more lifelong financial stability to ill and injured Veterans. What is often missed in the comparison between the NVC Disability Award benefits and the Pension Act Disability Pension are the additional lifelong and short term financial benefits awarded through the NVC, as well as the non-financial benefits the NVC offers in addressing care and quality of life. The NVC provides a new approach to Veteran care that focuses not only on providing financial stability, but also supports wellness and quality of life.

Comparing Financial Compensation

While there are significant additional benefits in the New Veterans Charter, there are critical faults and inequalities between the two systems that must be addressed, and that is what the Legion has been advocating for. Below we look at the benefits and gaps in compensation for ill and injured Veterans.

Life-long Financial Security for Seriously Ill and Injured Veterans

Proponents for the Disability Pension argue that the Pension Act provided a secure, fixed monthly payment for life, while the New Veterans Charter provides a lump sum payment that may be spent all at once, leaving the Veteran with nothing afterwards. In addition, proponents argue the Disability Pension gave eligible ill or injured Veterans a monthly payment for life that is greater than the one-time Disability Award received through the NVC.

For the most seriously ill and injured Veterans, those who are unable to work again and whose quality of life has been drastically impacted, their ability to lead a financially secure life and to reintegrate into civilian life has been dramatically affected. It is these Veterans are who are suffering the greatest under the NVC, and the Legion has long been advocating to ensure they have access to lifelong financial security. While on the surface, returning to the Pension Act may appear to be the best choice, it is the Legion’s position that the benefits offered under the NVC, along with the recommendations we are advocating for to strengthen the Charter, can actually pay out more in lifelong benefits for the most seriously ill and injured Veterans and their families.

As a start, through the New Veterans Charter, if the Veteran is taking part in VAC rehabilitation services, they may qualify for the Earnings Loss Benefit (ELB), a taxable, monthly benefit provided up until age 65 that ensures total income will be at least 90% minimum of the gross pre-release military salary. The Legion is advocating both to increase the ELB benefit to provide 100% of pre-release income and also to continue this benefit for life. In essence, this will provide an income for life for seriously ill and injured Veterans, and guarantee their future financial security.

The NVC offers the Permanent Impairment Allowance (PIA), to be renamed the Career Impact Allowance (CIA) in April 2017. The PIA provides a taxable, monthly benefit, payable for life for those whose career options have been limited because of a service-related illness or injury.

Financial Compensation for Ill and Injured Veterans

Proponents for the Disability Pension argue that the Pension Act provided greater financial compensation over the NVC, thereby better compensating them for their injury. However, when looking at compensation for injured Veterans, it is important to look not only at financial compensation, but also quality of life. The Charter provides additional benefits that, in terms of achieving optimal health and quality of life for the Veteran, exceeds that which the Pension Act provided. In the case of Veterans whose illness or injury is not incapacitating, these additional benefits help Veterans transition to civilian life, manage or overcome their injury or illness, and live healthy and well.

The Pension Act did not provide the supports or programs to help an ill or injured Veteran achieve their optimal health and wellbeing, meaning they could function well in society, transition to civilian life and return to work. The payment awarded under the old Pension Act was a fixed monthly payment that was determined by the type of injury the Veteran sustained, and did not take into consideration the full extent of the disability. For example, if a Veteran lost a leg, they received X amount each month. If a Veteran injured their back, they received Y amount each month. The disability was not assessed in terms of the ‘impact’ that injury may have on the individual’s life. It did not look at whether the individual would have difficulty returning to work. It did not consider whether the individual may require expensive rehabilitation services.

Under the NVC, in addition to the ELB and PIA, the programs outlined below provide additional financial stability and supports to achieve quality of life. These programs, along with the recommendations the Legion is advocating for, will ensure ill and injured Veterans can achieve financial security, as well as career, social and emotional wellbeing.

Canadian Forces Income Support
Supplementary Retirement Benefit for Veterans and families
Retirement Income Security Benefits for Veterans and families
Critical Injury Benefit
Death Benefit
Rehabilitation services for medical, psycho-social and vocational needs
Financial assistance to help Veterans remain independent and self-sufficient in their home and their community
Monthly income to replace lost wages while participating in a rehabilitation program
Operational Stress Injury support and mental health services for Veterans and families
Long term care
Access to group health insurance for Veterans and families
Career counselling, education, training and job-search support for Veterans and families
Educational grants for children
Family caregiver relief benefit for respite services for families
In addition to the benefits listed above, the Legion continues to advocate for further support and benefits for ill and injured Veterans.

The Legion Continues to Advocate for Change

While the Legion supports the concept of the New Veterans Charter, we continue to advocate for a full review of the Charter and press the government for changes. As it stands, the Charter is not sufficient to meet the needs of today’s Veterans and their families.

There is still financial inequality in standard of living when comparing the two systems, and the NVC does not adequately compensate the most seriously ill and injured Veterans in the long term. It is this group of Veterans and their families who must be financially compensated for their inability to work again. And it is this group that desperately needs financial support to help the Veteran and their family manage and live with the injury or illness.

The financial compensation and quality of life benefits outlined above, along with the recommendations the Legion is advocating for below, will address the financial disparity for those with incapacitating injuries or illness and will give the most seriously ill and injured Veterans lifelong financial security and care support that exceeds what was offered through the Pension Act. For Veterans whose illness or injury is not incapacitating, the programs above, along with the recommendations below, will ensure they will be financially secure and have the ability to achieve a high quality of life.

The Legion is currently focusing on advocating to improve the following deficiencies:

Increase the Earnings Loss Benefit (ELB) to provide 100% of pre-release income and provide ELB for life (not terminated at 65, as is currently the case). The projected career earnings of a CF Member should determine the minimum ELB.
Conduct essential academic research in the areas of Veteran physical and mental health to ensure an integrated approach to establishing Veterans Affairs Canada Entitlement Eligibility Guidelines. Research will guide the development of comprehensive support for ill and injured Veterans.
Provide financial compensation, support, education, and training to enable a family member to become a primary caregiver.
Provide recognition and a family identification card for spouses and dependents of serving members and Veterans.
Expand the Military/Veteran Family Services Pilot Program to all Military Family Resource Centres and make available to all Veterans and their families.
Streamline access to long term disability process and vocational rehabilitation programs to ensure all Veterans have easy access to rehabilitation and income support.
Through the Legion’s advocacy efforts and the efforts of others, our recommendations combined with the supports and services already available through the NVC will ensure that all Veterans and their families will have lifelong financial security, and the resources and support to live healthy and well.

For those who served to protect the very rights and freedoms we enjoy today, we owe our Veterans our commitment to work on their behalf. We stand committed, working to ensure the care and benefits of Canada’s Veterans are the best they can possibly be and that all governments honour their obligations to the men and women who serve in the Canadian Armed Forces.

http://www.legion.ca/article/advocating-for-life-long-financial-security-for-canadas-ill-and-injured-veterans/


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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by NAVRATILOVA on Tue 28 Mar 2017, 16:44

I D card very important! Legit!

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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by NAVRATILOVA on Tue 28 Mar 2017, 16:45

Very good ideas from this most noble of advocacy representatives of veterans and their families!

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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Teentitan on Wed 29 Mar 2017, 09:46

Well Navrat they are starting to talk the talk now they have to walk the walk...that's what we are all waiting for.
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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by NAVRATILOVA on Wed 29 Mar 2017, 13:04

I'm just saying if they follow thru and really push the government for these new changes as stated in their statement then it's as probably as good as veterans will get in this country. Veterans need a strong , vocal but also very large organization that will stand up to the government. Who cares if civilians are allowed to be members , as long as they are pro veteran that should be a plus for all of us. I do believe the senior positions should be veteran dominating but the more pro veteran members the more the government will listen. The pa is dead , and maybe we should move on, it's easy for some of us because we get the pa but nobody in government, no party wants it back so the chances of it returning are nil.

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Re: Royal Canadian Legion / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Teentitan on Wed 29 Mar 2017, 14:41

Nav I've been to a lot of Stakeholder meetings and the biggest problem with the Legion is the 2 year term limit for Dominion Command President.

I've seen 4 and each one has their own "style" to advocating from way laid back and quiet to very vocal. But every two years the Legion takes up a different approach. No continuity.

So I suggest that when you get a good veteran as DomCom President leave him/her in that position for 4-5 years. That way that person can see his work get done instead of being abandoned by a laid back DomCom President.

Get that change in the Legion and maybe more vets will join and help make the Legion voice grow from a whisper to a stern voice that will make the GoC listen and do what needs to be done.
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‘My grandfather and father would be enraged and truly disgusted by the province’s act of gross stupidity’

Post by Guest on Tue 11 Apr 2017, 17:05

‘My grandfather and father would be enraged and truly disgusted by the province’s act of gross stupidity’


Tuesday, April 11, 2017 1:05:27 EDT PM



The following is in response to the story Hydro costs forced sale of local Legion: http://www.nugget.ca/2017/04/05/hydro-costs-forced-sale-of-local-legion----fedeli - Fedeli which appeared April 5.

To the editor:

I have never been so thoroughly galvanized to respond to a government's act of disrespect but to have an organization, like the North Bay Legion, forced to sell its building due to a government-operated utility's charge is an unthinkable event.
What makes it more unpalatable is that my grandfather, Andrew Manley Forrest Lindsay who fought in the First World War at Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele and Ypres (wounded twice), was one of the members of this North Bay branch.

My late father who served in the Second World War (RCNVR, RCN) also was a member of this branch.

It sickens me that your government is taking more from our veterans, these revered band of brothers. This is not right.

My grandfather and father would be enraged and truly disgusted by the province’s act of gross stupidity. I weep for these men and their generations, their sacrifices in this, one of the supposedly best countries in the world.

Shame on you Kathleen Wynne. It's not about economics, politics or even ethics. It's about doing what is simply right.
My son is serving in the Armed Forces now. Where will his generation's Legions be if they are not able to pay some utility bill?
I challenge you, Ms. Wynne, to reply (and by you I mean you and not some intern or office staffer).

Better yet, stand up for our veterans, be the leader you claim to be and find a solution that would let them keep their building.

Use your office to waive this utility charge or defer/subsidize it and allow this branch to stay functioning in its building.

I may not be a resident of Ontario but I am a Canadian citizen and you can still do the right thing.

Bruce Lindsay
Calgary AB

http://www.nugget.ca/2017/04/11/my-grandfather-and-father-would-be-enraged-and-truly-disgusted-by-the-provinces-act-of-gross-stupidity

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Whitewater Brewing Co. set to launch Legion Lager

Post by Guest on Sat 22 Apr 2017, 10:02

Whitewater Brewing Co. set to launch Legion Lager


SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 2017


Cobden Branch 550 president Gene Phillion was honoured to be present at the first canning of Legion Lager at Whitewater Brewery in Cobden. Five per cent of the sales of Legion Lager will be donated to veterans programs across Canada. - Submitted

Whitewater Brewing Co. is toasting Canada’s veterans with their new Legion Lager.

“We are extremely proud to join forces with The Royal Canadian Legion Dominion Command to produce a new co-branded craft beer — the only beer that helps raise awareness and funds for legion programs for veterans,” says Whitewater. “Legion Lager will become available in our Ontario branches in May, and will soon be rolling out to local LCBOs, Beer Stores and retail outlets.”

Plans are underway to expand nationally, as Legion Lager is one of only a handful of craft brewed lagers in Canada.

“We’re thrilled that Whitewater has partnered with the legion to support Canada’s veterans by donating five per cent of the brand’s sales to legion programs,” says Dominion Command president David Flannigan. “Those funds will help support programs to improve the lives of veterans and their families.”

Flannigan looks forward to seeing the branches — whose volunteers work so hard to generate revenue to run their local programs and services — embrace the new brand and the opportunities it will provide. “Being able to serve our own Legion Lager, in a can or on tap, at legion branches means we can offer our members and other patrons an added beverage choice when they stop in for a visit.”

Sales from those purchases, he points out, also support the branches and the important work they do.

Chris Thompson, one of Whitewater’s three owners/founders, is also pleased with this partnership. “We’re honoured to have been chosen to brew a brand exclusively for an organization that does so much to help veterans. It’s a cause that is close to our hearts,” he says.

https://www.insideottawavalley.com/news-story/7254626-whitewater-brewing-co-set-to-launch-legion-lager/

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Legion's used medical equipment donation programs in jeopardy

Post by Guest on Thu 01 Jun 2017, 06:12

Legion's used medical equipment donation programs in jeopardy



By ANTONELLA ARTUSO, , MAY 31, 2017

For 10 years, Royal Canadian Legion member Allan Fillmore has been taking in donations of used medical equipment and handing the pieces out to those in need.

Not a day goes by where someone — usually a veteran or a social assistance recipient — doesn’t ask for a walker, a wheelchair or a bathing assistance device, he said.

“I’ve delivered hospital beds to people in Toronto; I’ve delivered wheelchairs to people in Kingston, donated wheelchairs to the Wheelchair of Hope, which is an organization that runs out of Belleville,” said Fillmore, a member of Branch 43 in Oshawa. “I’ve never made a dime off this thing. I don’t charge a cent. Any of my expenses come out of my own pocket ... If people need stuff, I try and get it to them.”

The decades-old Legion program is in jeopardy — other branches have already shut their programs down over concerns that someone will sue them for faulty equipment.

The issue came up at a general membership meeting just last weekend, he said.

Pamela Sweeny, executive director Ontario Command for the Royal Canadian Legion, said they’ve been advising branches to close the program for several years, and a fresh e-mail was sent out in April warning of the potential for lawsuits.

The Ontario Command will not force a branch to give up the program, but does strongly point out the risk, she said.

“Our insurance provider basically has confirmed to us that there’s a liability issue with lending out wheelchairs and scooters that could be in disrepair if they haven’t been properly certified,” Sweeny said. “Unfortunately, we’re becoming a little bit like the States where people have become sue-happy with slips and falls ... so it’s a liability issue that we have with refurbished equipment coming from branches.”

Fillmore said he goes over every piece of donated equipment and trashes those in a poor state of repair.

The only complaints he gets are from a company that’s in the business of supplying new medical equipment, he said.

“As a matter of fact, I just got an award from the Legion for what I’ve been doing,” Fillmore said.

Organizations that help the poor come calling for devices like walkers that can cost $47 a month to rent, or carry a $125 deductible to obtain new through government programs, he said.

Lots of people just don’t have that kind of money, Fillmore said.

Sweeny said the Legion is still making sure that veterans and their families get access to medical devices.

“If somebody qualifies and they’re in financial distress, and it’s a veteran, a dependent of a veteran, a widow of a veteran, if the need is there, we will provide medical devices,” she said. “But they’re brand new so we know they are in working order and they actually end up getting the proper fit. This is all done with certified people. It’s not that we’re walking away from it.”

However, the Legion will not cover the cost of medical devices for the general public, she said.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017/05/31/legions-used-medical-equipment-donation-programs-in-jeopardy

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Legion poppy funds to aid wildfire evacuees

Post by Guest on Wed 19 Jul 2017, 06:19


The BC and Yukon command of the Legion is suggesting money from the Poppy fund should be used to help wildfire victims.

Legion poppy funds to aid wildfire evacuees

B.C. and Yukon command issues call to local branches/size


DAN FERGUSON Tue Jul 18th, 2017 1:50pm

A letter to all B.C. Legion branches from regional headquarters has urged them to direct some of the funds from their annual poppy campaign to help people displaced by wildfires.

In the call to “comrades”, Sandy Reiser, Executive Director of the BC/Yukon Command asked B.C. branches to contribute “whatever Poppy Funds they can afford as a Special Use Expenditure” under Legion regulations.

A branch would have to hold a general membership meeting to approve the move, the letter indicates.

The letter was posted online by Langley Legion Branch No. 21. The BC/Yukon command confirmed the request has been made.

Last year, individual Legion branches across the country donated tens of thousands of dollars in poppy funds to aid Fort McMurray wildfire relief efforts.

The Reiser letter also suggests Legion branches “might consider holding a fundraiser with the explicit goal of helping those displaced by the wildfires.”

The finance committee of the BC/Yukon Command has approved grants of $5,000 each for the Prince George and Kamloops Legion branches in order to aid them in their disaster relief efforts “specifically, the continued provision of food and other necessities” to people being relocated to the two communities” the letter said.

“We do not know how long this state of emergency will last, however, the Legion should be prepared to render assistance for at least several weeks,” Reiser said.

Money raised from the annual Poppy campaign leading up to Remembrance Day by over 1400 Legion branches provides financial assistance and support to veterans, including memebers of the Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP.

Red Cross campaign

The Red Cross is collecting donations to help those affected by the B.C. fires.

Contributions can be made directly to the organization’s website.

A $100-million provincial government fund to help residents and communities was to be distributed through the Red Cross the same way Alberta handled financial aid to evacuees during the Fort McMurray fire.

The Thompson-Nicola Regional District is asking people not to make donations directly to evacuation centres “until we can provide further information on what items are required by evacuees and where donations can be dropped off.”

Local efforts

Six volunteers from the Langley Emergency Program were volunteering at the reception centre for evacuees in Williams Lake until the fire became too close and they had to be evacuated themselves, Langley City fire chief Rory Thompson said.

Four Township of Langley firefighters and a chief commanding officer went north to help fight the fire at Williams Lake.

The crew and truck left last week.

A winner wants to share

A Kamloops lotto winner said he will donate a portion of his lotto winnings to wildfire evacuees.

The BC Lottery Corporation announced Jason Labby of Kamloops, who won $500,000 playing the Extra on the July 7, 2017 Lotto Max draw, intends to use a portion of his winnings to help.

Anyone who sees a wildfire can report it by calling 1-800-663-5555 or *5555.

https://www.surreynowleader.com/news/legion-poppy-funds-to-aid-wildfire-evacuees/






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