History / Topics & Posted Articles

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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Teentitan on Mon 04 Mar 2013, 14:59

I know it's not Canadian related but this story goes even beyond Ripley's Believe it or Not!
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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Guest on Mon 04 Mar 2013, 15:36

now that was cool.

propat

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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Wife of a Veteran on Mon 04 Mar 2013, 21:35

Nice piece of trivia.
I agree Propat
Very Cool

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Anthony Dwyer

Post by MSDwyer on Tue 19 Mar 2013, 17:30

can you send me a private message?...tiltingsailor@hotmail.com
cheers
tony dwyer

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Tombstones of a Soldier

Post by Ex Member on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 08:33



COINS LEFT ON TOMBSTONES OF SOLDIERS

While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave. These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America's military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin. A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier's family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect.
Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.
A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together.
While a dime means you served with him in some capacity.
By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the solider when he was killed. According to tradition, the money left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for indigent veterans.
This practice became common during the Vietnam war, due to the political divide in the country over the war; leaving a coin was seen as a more practical way to communicate that you had visited the grave than contacting the soldier's family, which could devolve into an uncomfortable argument over politics relating to the war. Some Vietnam veterans would leave coins as a "down payment" to buy their fallen comrades a beer or play a hand of cards when they would finally be reunited. The tradition of leaving coins on the headstones of military men and women can be traced to as far back as the Roman Empire..

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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by bigrex on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 09:20

Obviously the meaning behind the different coins is long forgotten by most, since there are obviously nobody still alive from the time period that this person served, since the year of death is 1855, a 158 years ago. LOL, if you actually read the tombstone, it says "propietor of the "Lone Star of Texas" (a house of ill fame). In other words, the woman buried here did not serve in the military, but was a Madame at a brothel, so only God knows what the significance is for THOSE coins.
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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Ex Member on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 09:31

Thanks bigrex

I tried to read that stone and I just couldn't make out. Obviously, I need my glasses changed.

I feel bad now.......this don't belong here.

So sorry

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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by sailor964 on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 09:50

The picture is irrelevant widow. The words you speak are significant. Nice job.
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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Ex Member on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 09:54

My husband must be rolling in his grave, laughing at me now.

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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by rucksack031 on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 10:14

Hey WOV no your husband would be proud a pictures says a thousand words and IN the content of your photo has only made us remember of common practices back then, but may also add are still being done today, ex, arlington USA,France,UK with some modifications some of the larger cemetery have placed monuments at those sites where the general public can place coins for the sake of ease, a good exsample is here in CANADA where our public buy the poppy for a penny ,nickel,ext then they place the poppy on the grave, ex tomb of the unknown soldier Ottawa same concept so good job sister in reminding us all on traditions. RUCKSACK031
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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by bigrex on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 10:46

life is about laughing off our little mishaps, so no big issue. I am just shocked that someone would put that info on a headstone. "Here lies Ellen, she was a whore!" lol
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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Ex Member on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 13:22

Thank you all.

You guys are taking it better than I was. Thank you for making me take it in a different way.

I'll take the picture as a joke.......lol.

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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by Guest on Sat 17 Aug 2013, 14:54

thank you for those words widow like soldier said the picture is irrelevant just the meaning.

propat

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Re: History / Topics & Posted Articles

Post by HAPPYCRAZY on Sun 18 Aug 2013, 12:15

lol! WOV. true story for sure. It touches the heart of the soul. seen it many times and often wondered does anybody understand it. You brought it all back to life again thks. As for bigrex telling and reading what it was on the t-stone, well I'm still laughing my s-locker off. I always wondered where the two-bit ........... came from. LOL
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Remember lessons learned at Dieppe

Post by Teentitan on Mon 19 Aug 2013, 08:36

It speaks volumes for the Canadian character that when our soldiers hear battlefield gunfire they run towards it — not the other way.

It is in their training — some might say their national DNA — to actively go into harm’s way wherever it presents itself.

So it was 71 years ago when Canada made its opening land-based foray into the European theatre of the Second World War.

Just after 5 a.m. on Aug. 19, 1942, an amphibious force composed almost entirely of Canadian infantry went ashore near the French town of Dieppe and suffered an horrendous toll in a fight that was as good as over by 10:50 a.m.

In those five hours and 50 minutes, a total of 3,623 of the 6,086 men (almost 60%) who made it ashore were killed, wounded or captured.

The figures include 913 deaths and 1,946 captives, some of who died in German prisoner-of-war camps, according to Veterans Affairs.

It was a massive price in blood for the men of the Canadian Second Division who lost more prisoners than in the whole 11 months of the later campaign in North-West Europe, or the 20 months during which Canadians fought in Italy.

Canadian strength had already been tested elsewhere, with close to 2,000 men and women involved in the fall of Hong Kong. They had fought for 18 days but were eventually overwhelmed by superior Japanese forces.

In a way what happened at Dieppe was a continuation of that desperate fight to hold that British colony as the world desperately worked to find a way to halt the forces of tyranny.

Canada’s losses on the pebble shorefront at Dieppe were not in vain.

Planners took away lessons on how to conduct an opposed amphibious landing and applied them with detail to D-Day.

Lord Louis Mountbatten, whose Combined Operations Command had planned and executed the raid, long maintained that the lives lost at Dieppe saved thousands more at Normandy.

“The battle of D-Day was won on the beaches of Dieppe,” he insisted, justifying it ultimately as “one of the most vital operations of the Second World War. It gave to the Allies the priceless secret of victory.”

Maybe.

What is more certain is Canada had asked for the Dieppe assignment and sought a purpose for the troops already stationed in Britain and anxious to play their part.

They knew the risks but as one of Canada’s last survivors of the raid told me last week, he was “excited” at the chance to take on the Nazis.

It was why Arthur Rossell had left the family farm and joined the Essex Scottish Regiment.

Rossell told me he “wanted to fight for freedom and fight for Canada.”

The fact Canadians went looking for action has subsequently been confirmed by Victoria Cross winner Lt.-Col. C.C.I. Merritt.

He said after the war: “We were very glad to go, we were delighted.” Taken prisoner during the assault, Merritt recalled, “We were up against a very difficult situation and we didn’t win; but to hell with this business of saying the generals did us dirt.”

Canadians have been involved in conflicts since Dieppe including D-Day and Korea, more recently in the mountains of Afghanistan. There has been peace to keep as well in places as far apart as the Balkans and East Timor.

All combatants have been heirs of that Canadian tradition of moving towards the fight and not away.

As for those who gave their lives at Dieppe, three simple words suffice.

Lest we forget.

http://www.torontosun.com/2013/08/16/remember-lessons-learned-at-dieppe
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