Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

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Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Trooper on Wed 08 Jun 2016, 06:04

National leaders have refused a provincial request to disclose salaries and travel expenses.

Sean Bruyea argues that rather than an organization for veterans, the legion exists more like a social club using veterans as props.

By SEAN BRUYEA
PUBLISHED : Wednesday, June 8, 2016 12:00 AM
The national leadership of the Royal Canadian Legion faces a crisis in confidence with its membership along with Canada’s veterans. All Canadians should be concerned with this, given the legion’s responsibility for the poppy symbol and the millions donated as a result.
The legion once actively and assertively advocated for the rights of veterans and their families. The community work performed by many local branches is highly commendable. Provincial Commands, without consideration of personal reward or enrichment, have frequently launched innovations to assist veterans such as homeless-shelter programs.
In contrast, paid senior leadership at national headquarters, known as Dominion Command and located in a suburb of Ottawa, is at risk of being perceived as out of touch with not just veterans but legion membership. Much of the blame for plummeting membership can be placed directly on the leadership’s shoulders.
Why should veterans care about how the legion manages its affairs? After all, of the legion’s about 254,000 paid members on June 1, 62,000 are listed as “ordinary” members. This category includes those who served in Canada’s military but also retired and serving members of the RCMP, civilian police forces, armed forces of all 28 NATO nations, as well as the Canadian Coast Guard.
There are 700,000 serving and retired Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) personnel. The legion’s website states that almost 100,000 of its members are veterans. However, one insider I talked to estimates that fewer than 35,000 legion members have served in the CAF, or five per cent of the CAF veteran population. Rather than an organization for veterans, the legion exists more like a social club using veterans as props.
The legion national leadership has long attributed membership decline to the sad passing of war veterans. There is little truth to this. Of the 37,000 members who did not renew last year, only one in 18 was because of a veteran’s death. The legion’s national leadership has failed to curb the voluntary exit of so many, as well as attract enough veterans and other Canadians alike.
Notwithstanding the legion’s long decline in membership, the legion profoundly benefits from Canadians’ sympathy and support for all veterans. Canadians don’t wear the poppy to honour the legion, they wear it to honour men and women who offer to sacrifice for Canada. That is why all veterans, but also all Canadians, should care deeply about how the legion is managed.

As the legion website states, “On June 30, 1948, the Royal Canadian Legion was given the responsibility to safeguard the poppy as a sacred symbol of remembrance by the people of Canada through an act of Parliament in which the Legion was granted trademark copyright of the poppy symbol in Canada.” The website also notes, “Canadians are fiercely proud of our veterans.”
We are also fiercely proud of our poppy. It was Canadian John McCrae’s poem that spawned the adoption of the poppy symbol in many countries to represent the sacrifices of war.
The legion has what can only be described as a monopoly and legal stranglehold upon the use of the poppy as a symbol of remembrance. Such immense responsibility requires the highest standards of transparency, openness, and accountability.
Instead, Dominion Command leadership has at times practised a standard that more resembles evasion and obfuscation.
A barely noticed article in Le Journal de Montréal published just before Remembrance Day last year raised questions about the management of this sacred responsibility. The newspaper reported that of the nearly $16.5 million raised the year prior from poppy donations, Dominion Command could account for only $114,000 awarded directly to veterans from its own Poppy Fund while millions more lay dormant. The legion said Le Journal de Montreal report contained “incorrect or misleading information” and said that the $16.5 million was “distributed to veteran related services in communities across the country.”
This same leadership recently transferred $500,000 from Canadians’ poppy donations to the Invictus Games when the money may not go directly to Canadian veteran participants. Rather, poppy money would support the operation of the games, involving wounded soldiers from 16 countries. Would providing volunteers and hosting the cross-country torch relay not be sufficient?
For such weighty responsibility, national leadership has taken a rather tacky path to marketing the poppy symbol. One can purchase poppy drop earrings, poppy napkins to become stained with food, umbrellas, mittens, toques, and headbands, not to mention stuffed poppy puppies. This is far from responsible management of a sacred symbol that represents death in war, loss of limb, and the wounding of minds and souls.
In an attempt to restore some confidence, Manitoba Command has urged Dominion Command to be more transparent by disclosing salaries and travel expenses. Dominion Command refused to allow the discussion of Manitoba’s motion at the biennial national convention to be held June 11 to 15 in St. John’s, Nfld.

What will not be discussed openly can be deduced through legion financial statements and other non-confidential sources.
Not counting Legion Magazine, Dominion Command has 43 permanent employees. Most are clerical staff, such as those who manage supply, finance, and membership. Managing this small group are four directors and a dominion secretary, Brad White. In the public service, 43 employees would merit one director at most. In the military, this would be the equivalent of base or wing administration led by a single lieutenant-colonel.
In rejecting the motion to reveal salaries, Dominion Command circulated a five-page brief indicating “we pay LESS than the going rates in the marketplace.”
Steven Clark, director of administration for the Legion’s Dominion Command, told The National Post that it hasn’t been disclosing individuals’ salaries for privacy reasons. There is no legislative requirement to do it, he said, as the organization is not federally or publicly funded. Expenses are tightly controlled after concerns were raised by members in 2014, the Post reported him saying.
For my analysis, I used the equivalent of market rate or higher for non-directors to deduce, from the 2016 Dominion Command budget, a conservative salary range of the directors. To measure the market rate, I used websites that compare salaries like payscale.com and glassdoor.ca.
Salaries for the directors of supply and finance are likely $115,000 to $140,000 and $120,000 to $170,000 respectively depending upon whether market rate or above-market rate is applied to other jobs in these sections. Notably, all salaries are budgeted separately from employer-paid benefits such as pension contributions.
As for the director of administration, the deputy director of marketing, and the dominion secretary, these three salaries were less apparent due to a reorganization not reflected in the most recent budget. Nevertheless, out of a total salary budget of just over $2.8 million, these three positions account for $425,000to $555,000.
Considering other directors’ salaries, deputy directors could be earning $95,000to $120,000 while the director of administration, likely the highest-paid director, could receive from $140,000 to $180,000. This would leave $185,000 to $255,000 for the dominion secretary’s salary.
Dominion Command does publish one salary: the janitor/custodian at $26,800 annually, roughly $13.50 per hour. The market median for this job is $16 per hour or $32,000 annually.

The Service Bureau section is the most opaque. Six service officers and two assistants help veterans access disability benefits, a job similar to Veterans Affairs Canada’s client service agents and case managers. Case managers have medical, nursing, social work, and often post-graduate backgrounds. Do any of the service officers have such credentials? Are they bilingual? Do they have university degrees? Assuming the current director makes $110,000 to $130,000 to manage seven employees, service officers could earn up to $80,000. This is the maximum a VAC case manager makes and 80 per cent more than new client service agents earn.
Of all sections, the Service Bureau demands accountability and transparency: 90 per cent of its budget is paid for by Canadians’ poppy donations.
A director in the public service can earn $107,000 to $140,000. Commanders and lieutenant-colonels command ships, squadrons, and regiments earning $116,000 to $124,000. None of Dominion Command’s jobs has responsibilities to justify such stratospheric salaries. It is not clear what responsibility Dominion Command has for what occurs at the provincial or local branch levels. All are responsible for their own accounts, charitable status, tax filings, service officers, and poppy campaigns.
If Dominion Command approves below- or at-market rates for the majority of its employees, then directors and deputy directors are receiving excessively exorbitant compensation for limited responsibilities. If leadership authorizes more than market rates, then Dominion Command has misled legion membership about salaries. Similarly, paying more than the market demands shows irresponsibility and incompetence in managing trusted membership and poppy funds.
Part of the problem lies with an elected executive that meets biannually. Paid senior staff may see the executive as a nuisance. The current elected president, Tom Eagles, has spent 37 years in the Legion but never served in the military. He has worked as a groundskeeper and maintenance worker at the recreation centre for the village of Plaster Rock, N.B. The Legion website indicates Mr. Eagles is also past-president of Plaster Rock’s Minor Hockey League and sat on the board of a 30-bed local long-term care facility.
An admirable rise through legion ranks, but what skill set and experience does he bring to assume the sacred responsibility of protecting the poppy for all veterans and Canadians? Add to this the 75 per cent legion membership who never served in the military, and the appreciation for the poppy is bound to become diminished and distorted.

Dominion Command and Tom Eagles declined multiple requests to answer questions on these matters or to be interviewed.
The monumental responsibility of safeguarding the poppy should not remain with leadership that fails the most basic tests of transparency, accountability, and democracy—not to mention sound and fair management. Dominion Command’s doors must be open to a forensic audit so that all of Canada, including Parliament, and every veteran, can attest to the protection and preservation of the most hallowed symbol of sacrifice. The memories embodied in the poppy must remain sacred when the veteran is long gone.
Sean Bruyea, vice-president of Canadians for Accountability, is a retired Air Force intelligence officer and frequent commentator on government, military, and veterans’ issues.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times

http://www.hilltimes.com/2016/06/08/why-canada-needs-to-pry-open-the-doors-of-the-legions-headquarters/68360
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Dannypaj on Wed 08 Jun 2016, 06:35

David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen
Tuesday, Jun. 7, 2016


Joan Beznoski, 82, has been a member of the Royal Canadian Legion for 36 years, but has now been suspended. Handout


Joan Beznoski is your typical member of the Royal Canadian Legion.




Her two brothers and her husband fought in the Korean War. Her dad fought in the Second World War.

The 82-year-old has been at the same legion branch for 36 years in Lac du Bonnet, Man., just north of Winnipeg.

She had served as secretary of the branch and has devoted countless hours to volunteer work there.

But now she has been suspended from the legion.

Her transgression?

To phone the main legion office in Ottawa to try to talk to dominion president Tom Eagles to voice her dissatisfaction about how the country’s largest veterans’ organization is treating former soldiers.


Sgt Ronald Duchesne, Rideau Hall/File

Sgt Ronald Duchesne, Rideau Hall/FileLegion Dominion President Tom Eagles

She never did get to talk to Eagles. But the suspension came swiftly after she tried.

“The legion is losing members because of how people are being treated and how the (legion) is operating,” Beznoski explained in an interview. “It’s time someone did something about it.”

She is not alone in that thinking.

As some 1,500 delegates gather in St. John’s this weekend for the legion’s convention, concerns are being raised about questionable practices in the organization, its Dominion Command headquarters in Ottawa, and financial accountability for the millions of dollars it receives from the public from the sale of poppies.

Some legion members had hoped to use the convention to force Dominion Command, the legion’s administrative organization, to reveal details about executives paid more than $100,000 a year. Those members also want to find out about the cost of travel and expenses for executives, and their spouses and families.

That effort has been shot down. Legion executives say the privacy of executives would be violated by such disclosure.

Veterans have also questioned why Eagles, accompanied by his wife, flew to the Caribbean in the winter of 2015 to present a cheque to a Commonwealth veterans’ organization. Others have asked for details about how much it cost to send Eagles and the dominion secretary Brad White, reportedly with their spouses, to a number of conferences recently in the United Kingdom.

Another veteran from a low-income family has questioned why Eagles’ two sons received two of four legion bursaries offered at one branch, when her children were denied.

Legion spokesman Bruce Poulin acknowledged the questions.

“These are all questions regarding internal operations of the Legion,” he noted in an email. “As per the Legion’s General By-Laws, the avenue for members to raise queries or effect change is through the Legion’s chain of command and the resolution process.”  

But that doesn’t appear like it is going to happen in some cases.

Lorne Tyson, a member from Winnipeg who has been advocating for Dominion Command to reveal salaries and travel expenses of executives, has been informed the matter cannot be discussed or even raised in St. John’s.

“Instead of transparency, we have more secrecy, and instead of accountability, we are told that there will be no accountability,” Tyson wrote earlier this year to Jack Frost, chairman of the legion’s Dominion Command.

In a previous interview, Steven Clark, director of administration for Dominion Command, insisted expenses are strictly controlled.




Other veterans have raised concerns about the value of some of the services the legion provides.

The organization has created a new Operation Stress Injury Special Section for those with PTSD and related injuries. The special section does not actually provide health care, but will direct veterans to already available services. The legion is charging a $10 administrative fee for those who want the service. The legion declined to explain why veterans suffering from PTSD are required to pay the fee .

In addition, Craig Hood, whose nomination as interim first vice president for the section is expected to be approved at the convention, has denounced on the National Post website a veteran’s advocate who suffers from PTSD, as well as another injured veteran. He labelled them “as morons.”

Hood’s Facebook page also includes a posting from another individual about those same veterans, who have criticized legion practices, labelling them as “f…tards and losers.”

Hood did not comment. Dominion Command acknowledged it is aware of Hood’s comments about fellow veterans but declined to denounce them.

Supporters of the legion say the organization, with 300,000 members, still does good work. But its membership is dwindling and many of its current members are no longer veterans.

Allan McArthur, a veteran who is trying to help the suspended Beznoski, said she was right to try to raise concerns about the problems within her branch.







Beznoski was suspended after White, the dominion secretary, wrote to legion executives in Manitoba.

In a letter obtained by the Ottawa Citizen, White pointed out Beznoski wanted Dominion Command to conduct an investigation into ongoing problems in the Lac du Bonnet branch, including allegations of bullying and disrespectful behaviour against veterans.

White, however, noted he had no intention of looking into those allegations.

An official with the legion in Lac du Bonnet said Beznoski’s suspension was being dealt with and no further information would be released.

But McArthur said the treatment of the 82-year-old is symptomatic of larger problems. Those issues range from ignoring veterans’ issues to questions about how money raised from the sale of poppies is spent, he noted.

“They’ve kicked out a long-time member for what — trying to phone the president to talk about mistreatment of veterans,” McArthur said. “What does that tell you about the legion?”


http://www.nationalpost.com/m/wp/blog.html?b=news.nationalpost.com%2Fnews%2Fcanada%2Fcanadian-legion-suspends-82-year-old-member-for-questioning-groups-treatment-of-veterans

Another one bites the dust
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by teentitan on Wed 08 Jun 2016, 11:13

Sure would like to know how much the Legion makes for stamping a piece of paper to confirm the applicant is a veteran so they can get a veteran licence plate?

It now makes me wonder how many have the licence plate but never served?
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Ex Member on Wed 08 Jun 2016, 18:37

We usually stamp them over some cold suds or sometimes flipping a coin works!

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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by pinger on Wed 08 Jun 2016, 21:58

Jocularity aside, I choose not to have a poppy plate. JMO but too much vanity for my liking but I can appreciate someone elses choice.

I was trying to look up what the RCL fee is for the poppy plate app. and I could not find it. My memory reads $5 somewhere??? Should be able to go to VAC to get one for free if you want one.

Nada, Seems like the legion has the cahoots with every provincial M.O.T.
So much for the principles of it all.

BTW, Silly me, always thought a poppy plate was only for a disabled vet. No matter, my disabled sticker helps me a LOT.

But in my bebopping, I found this older 2013 article that's somewhat related.

http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/veteran-furious-over-ticket

Stay well all.
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by teentitan on Wed 08 Jun 2016, 22:10

Navrat wrote:We usually stamp them over some cold suds or sometimes flipping a coin works!

So business as usual then is what you are saying?

To bad no one told 82 year old Joan Beznoski a veteran widow not to call the Dominion Command President to talk about how the Legion isn't helping veterans during happy hour. But she did upset the normal business practices so she deserved to be suspended from her Legion.
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Guest on Wed 08 Jun 2016, 23:07

same old same old teen I'm sure its not the first vets org to do something like this probably not the last . its a shame that members of these organizations cant speak of their own concerns within their own organizations without being bullied threatened or just thrown clean out of the organization .

but what the frack right they are only members they are not the me me me selfish no good for nothing my way or the highway so called leaders they are just members and in some cases nothing but lowly vets .

ya show me a so called leader that will allow an open and honest conversation about an issue more than likely I will show you one that's on the right side of that issue .

show me one that shuts that conversation down ill show you one that's both on the wrong side of the issue and a coward .

you show me one just one that will allow that conversation to happen even if he dislikes the conversation at all but is willing to listen anyway ... well all else aside right or wrong ill show you a leader and someone that's not afraid of winning or losing a debate or any other childish concern but one who wants to understand the people they are supposedly represent and serve .

thing is how the frack can these people represent the concerns of their members when they will not even listen to them when they present their concerns ?

fracking impossible .

yup the art of listening is lost the center cannot hold tuning and turning in a widening well you know the rest .

anyway this guy lost a chance to learn something yup just like SGT Shultz something he already knew but didn't want to actually or officially hear so he fired her the frack out .

seems to me vets orgs have served their purpose in the past but now with the political leanings and BS self serving leadership agendas and greed . for the most part their time has come and gone especially this highest of profile one . they no longer matter .

for the most part all that's left is the vets themselves and if they are all willing to stand up for themselves and every other vet out their at the drop of a hat really that's all we need and this specific vet org can go frack itself .

propat

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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Dannypaj on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 06:01

Your right, you are your own best advocate.
Trust me on this one.
No one is looking out for you, but yourself.
Apply, apply, apply.
The fight is not over, unless "you" feel it is over.
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by teentitan on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 09:03

Well propat totally agree with you. Very few vet orgs that let you speak your mind without being bullied to shut up and sit down.

The bureaucrats plan was executed perfectly by creating 19 or so different "kinds" of vets has caused nothing but chaos within the vet community.

As much as some vet orgs say "One Vet One Standard" there is always a 'but' attached when an issue pops up.

I just don't like the fact the Legion is acting like VAC and keeping the conversation under control and not letting the dollar figures out on employees. It's hypocritical. I also don't like the fact that they think they own the copyright to the poppy. It's nothing but a cash grab for the Legion not veterans who Canadians donate their money to every November
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Guest on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 10:20

ya teen that's what gets me the most the fracking hypocrisy . if they don't like the GOC dictating what will be and will not be discussed at meetings then don't do it yourself . its absolutely maddening .

ya know if these guys ever complain about the GOC controlling the conversation and their is a vet org rep in the room whos org doesn't commit the same offences well he should stand right up and tell them flat out .... hey we all get that and agree but since you do the same thing within your own org YOU have no right to complain , when and IF something comes up that you have the moral legs to speak on you giver until then do us all a big favor and shut the frack up .

this is an org I had planed on joining upon retirement and planning to do it almost my whole life . never really looked into them ore how they operate just thought they were what they were perceived to be . in around 2005 and 06 things changed and then I started to look .

ohhh boy its ugly and the more I see behind that polished exterior the uglier it gets.

propat

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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by 6608 on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 11:01

Legion’s decision to kick out 82-year-old woman not a story, says Legion’s Craig Hood

DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN

On Wednesday I had an article on Joan Beznoski, a long-time member of the Royal Canadian Legion who got suspended for trying to contact the legion’s Dominion Command president Tom Eagles.

Beznoski’s two brothers and her husband fought in the Korean War. Her dad fought in the Second World War.

The 82-year-old has been at the same legion branch for the last 36 years in Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, just north of Winnipeg.

She had served as secretary of the branch and has devoted countless hours to volunteer work there.

But the suspension came shortly after she phoned the main legion office in Ottawa and tried to talk to Eagles to voice her dissatisfaction about how the country’s largest veterans’ organization is treating former soldiers.

She never did get to talk to Eagles. She did, however, talk to the legion’s dominion secretary Brad White.

In a letter, obtained by the Citizen, White pointed out Beznoski wanted Dominion Command to conduct an investigation into ongoing problems in the Lac du Bonnet branch, including allegations of bullying and disrespectful behaviour against veterans.

White, however, noted he had no intention of looking into those allegations.

Beznoski was suspended shortly after talking to White.

Her supporters say she is now facing a life-time ban from the legion.

The article also looked at concerns raised by legion members about questionable practices in the organization, its Dominion Command headquarters in Ottawa, and financial accountability for the millions of dollars it receives from the Canadian public from the sale of poppies.

Some legion members had hoped to use the organization’s convention this week in Newfoundland to force Dominion Command, the legion’s administrative organization, to reveal details about the executives there who receive over $100,000 a year. Those members also want to find out about the cost of the travel and expenses paid to the executives, as well as the legion money used to finance the travel of their spouses and family members.

That effort, by legion member Lorne Tyson and others, has been shot down. Legion executives say the privacy of legion executives would be violated by such disclosure.

The response to the article has been significant. A number of new allegations about misspending of legion funds or questionable activities have been forwarded to my email. Also forwarded were the stories of other former legion members who found themselves kicked out of the organization for asking too many probing questions.

The legion was asked for comment. In addition comment was requested from Tom Eagles and others involved in the Beznoski issue.

Legion spokesman Bruce Poulin issued a statement in response to the issues raised: “These are all questions regarding internal operations of the Legion.  As per the Legion’s General By-Laws, the avenue for members to raise queries or effect change is through the Legion’s chain of command and the resolution process.”

But Craig Hood, who expects to be named to a top legion position at the weekend convention, went on social media to provide additional views. He denounced the article and myself for writing it.

Hood doesn’t appear to have an issue with concerns about financial accountability or the legion’s decision to suspend Beznoski.

“Hell, there wasn’t even a story,” stated Hood, who has been in the legion for about three years.

He argues that “it was more of a collage of little incidents that weren’t even accurately reported.”

That’s a strange comment since the legion itself has confirmed Beznoski’s suspension and Tyson’s proposal for more accountability on Dominion Command finances and salaries is well documented in various venues.

Hood is also mentioned in the article, although he declined to provide comment.

Hood has been nominated as interim first vice president for the legion’s new Operation Stress Injury Special Section. That section is created, according to the legion, to help those with PTSD and other related injuries.

But anyone who wants to join the section – including those with various illnesses and their family members – must each pay a $10 administrative fee.

Why?

No one is saying.

The Operation Stress Injury Special Section does not actually provide health care but will instead direct veterans to already available services.

The legion declined to explain why veterans suffering from PTSD are required to pay an administration fee so they can be told of services that are already out there and offered by other agencies. The section will also “promote public awareness.”

Some sources, however, contend that the money collected from those suffering from PTSD will be used to pay for travel, hotels and per diems for the executive members running the section.

I asked Glynne Hines, the interim president of the OSSI about that. No response. I asked Hines for an explanation on the reasoning for the $10 fee. No response. I asked Hood the same questions. No response.



http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/legions-decision-to-kick-out-82-year-old-woman-not-a-story-says-legions-craig-hood





Cheers
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Trooper on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 13:20

The poppy funds are suppose to go towards helping Veterans and Veterans in need!

Canadians donate to the poppy fund with the mindset that the funds they are donating are going towards helping Veterans!

The volunteers who volunteer their own time to collect poppy funds are not paid!

The Legion will not disclose financial statements on salaries or other funds used outside of helping Veterans because they are hiding behind corruption.
If they had nothing to hide all expenses would be made public.

The Legion should no longer be the ones managing the poppy funds.
A new group such as an advocate group with a watchdog put in place to oversee the allocations of the funds should now be considered.
Any expenses should be kept to a bare minimum with a full and open accountability/transparency.
This should be done in a voluntary way to allow for the bulk of funds to be put where it's purpose is , helping Veterans.
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by bigrex on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 14:51

VAC should take over the poppy funds, because as a government agency, they would at least have to account for how the money is spent. The RCL, or any other advocacy group, that could be chosen, are not obligated to be transparent, even to their members. Therefor we would always run the risk of that money making it into the pockets of the leadership, or select friends and members, instead of those in need.
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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by Guest on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 16:04

the legion is not hiding behind corruption they are hiding behind their rules that's it that's all.

that's control boys and that's how you control the massage rules .

only the members themselves know what issues are important to the members themselves that aint rocket science . if the members were allowed open and honest debate about THEIR concerns the legion would end up reflecting that .

however this organizations so called leadership has different concerns than its membership but want their concerns here hered as if they were the concerns of all its members . they use their rules to stifle any open and honest debate on the concerns and issues and in the end effectively tell what their concerns are weather they like it or not . and if they don't tow the line and shut up about their real concerns are bullied and threatened . if they still don't shut up then they are thrown out because they failed to follow the rules .

yup the tail truly is wagging the dog here but ive seen a dog bite its own tail before and would love nothing more to see it happen here .

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Re: Why Canada needs to pry open the doors of the legion’s headquarters

Post by bigrex on Thu 09 Jun 2016, 16:41

Propat, just because they are hiding behind the rules, doesn't mean there is no corruption. After all, they are the ones who created the rules to avoid having any accountability. There is no real reason that members of the RCL should be traveling the globe, attending conferences. They do not make policy for Veterans, and as far as anyone can tell, have not taken anything away from these conferences, that directly benefited Veterans. And would it not be considered a corrupt act, that the children of one of these senior staff, received half of the bursaries offered by their local legion, even though he is making well over $100000/yr to manage a handful of people? That is either an abuse of power, or a outright theft. Most organizations and companies, make family of staff ineligible to win any prize, to avoid any conflict of interest or perception of wrong doing.
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