Cree RCAF member left suicidal after years of racist abuse in the military

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Cree RCAF member left suicidal after years of racist abuse in the military

Post by Trooper on Thu 22 Dec 2016, 17:27

Cree RCAF member left suicidal after years of racist abuse in the military

'We cannot accept this sort of behaviour' within the Royal Canadian Air Force, commanding officer says

By Ashley Burke, CBC News Posted: Feb 11, 2016 5:42 PM ET Last Updated: Feb 11, 2016 6:34 PM ET


Cree airman left suicidal after years of abuse

A Cree member of the Royal Canadian Air Force says he is leaving the military after enduring years of racism that left him feeling ostracized and contemplating suicide.

Master Cpl. Marc Frenette served under "poor, incompetent and often inconsistent leadership" that allowed the alleged harassment to continue for so long, according to a military report obtained by CBC News.  

"He was on his hands and knees in the shower crying because he didn't know how he could take anymore," his wife Kristina Paudash-Frenette told CBC News. "It's been heartbreaking. No one deserves this at all."


Marc Frenette

This report comes at a time when the military is preparing to launch a new diversity strategy in late February to recruit more women, visible minorities and aboriginal members.

The aviation technician, 38, said he joined the military a decade ago to be part of a team. But for the last three years he says he's felt like an outsider. Frenette alleges the racism started when he moved to Petawawa's new helicopter squadron from Moose Jaw in 2013.

'If I was to meet indigenous youth I'd tell them, "Don't join the military."'

Frenette says squadron members at Garrison Petawawa taunted him daily with racial slurs like "kawish," "wagon burner," and hooted offensive "oh-oh-oh" noises as he passed by in the hallway.

While working on a Chinook helicopter in February 2015, an RCAF member allegedly sparked a lighter underneath him and said, "time to burn this Indian before he burns any more wagons."

"That pretty much broke me," Frenette told CBC News. "That's when I thought, what's going to be next."

Told to laugh it off

When he went to his chain of command for help, Frenette says, he was told to laugh it off.

"I felt like it was a battle," Frenette said. "I had to fight almost the chain of command, where I was hoping they would be helping me."

Frenette sent his chief warrant officer a two-page complaint asking to move squadrons over concerns for his safety.


Master Cpl. Marc Frenette was subjected to years of racist abuse while a serving member of the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Lt.-Col. Chris McKenna, commanding officer of 450 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, who ordered an internal investigation of Frenette's claims, told CBC News he was outraged by what Frenette endured.

CBC News obtained the final report of that investigation, which revealed that the 25 squadron members interviewed during the probe either withheld information or only told partial accounts of what happened.

"I was furious," McKenna said in an interview with CBC about the allegations. "I was very angry this would have happened in my organization."

The report also revealed significant breakdowns in leadership allowing the alleged harassment to continue without  disciplinary action.

"My disappointment not only in the poor behaviour and performance of [the members] … is only surpassed by the poor, incompetent, and often inconsistent leadership provided" McKenna wrote in the report. "I am appalled at the lack of immediate and swift action.

"We cannot accept this sort of behaviour within the RCAF… as it degrades morale, combat effectiveness, and will ultimately stand in the way of delivering tactical aviation effects on a battlefield of the future."

According to the internal report the leadership involved were talked to about the gravity of not ensuring a harassment-free workplace, compelled to attend a series of professional development sessions. The officer who failed to follow up the initial complaint was issued a recorded warning.  


Lt.-Col. Chris McKenna

"It's all about making sure that next time this does not occur and not giving up on someone by kicking them out of the military," McKenna said. "These are junior folks who are still learning their role … I wanted to make sure that they realize what right looks like and they have a very clear picture of that now."

Between 2001 and 2012, there were 290 cases of racism complaints within the Canadian Forces, and 129 of those cases were won by the complainants. The military recorded the numbers to review its human rights and discriminatory conduct policy. Since then, the force says it has not compiled data annually.

However, since 2013 there have been 11 human rights complaints forwarded to the Canadian Forces by the Canadian Human Rights Commission on the grounds of race, colour or religion. Of these 11 cases, eight are continuing, while the others were dropped.

Promoting diversity in military

Lt.-Gen. Christine Whitecross said one of her three priorities in implementing the upcoming diversity strategy is to increase diversity numbers.

The Canadian Forces still falls far short of reaching the required targets, according to figures provided by the military:

[/b]

  • Women: 15 per cent (goal is 25.1 per cent).



  • Visible minorities: 6.5 per cent (goal is 11.8 per cent).



  • Aboriginal peoples: 2.5 per cent (goal is 3.4 per cent).



"We want a diverse and respectful organization," said Col. François Bariteau, a spokesman with the Department of National Defence. "One that values differences, one that recognizes differences and can deal with differences."

Concerned the military wasn't doing enough to discipline the alleged offenders in his case, Frenette filed a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission in November, 2015.

The military says it did take action by launching a second, parallel harassment investigation, which is still underway. It involves alternative dispute resolution sessions in which Frenette sits down with a mediator and the eight people alleged to have allegedly harassed him, to confront the realities of racism and how it affected Frenette.

But Frenette says it's not enough.

"I feel the organization should be held accountable for what is done," he said.

Frenette, who is leaving the military at the end of the month, says he contemplated suicide. His marriage, once happy, has suffered, so he's moving with his wife and eight-year-old son to Hiawatha First Nation, a place where they hope to pull their lives back together.

"I feel disheartened and I'm emotionally drained," Frenette said. "I feel like I was abandoned. I was someone they couldn't really wait to get rid of as opposed to someone they wanted to care for.

"If I was to meet indigenous youth I'd tell them, 'Don't join the military."


Kristina Paudash-Frenette

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/racist-abuse-canadian-air-force-1.3443197
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'Systemic' racism in Canadian Forces needs inquiry, veterans say

Post by Trooper on Thu 22 Dec 2016, 17:45

'Systemic' racism in Canadian Forces needs inquiry, veterans say

Royal Canadian Air Force veteran Rubin Coward said constant taunts and discrimination led to PTSD

CBC News Posted: Mar 13, 2014 5:26 PM AT Last Updated: Mar 13, 2014 6:06 PM AT


Canadian Forces veteran Wally Fowler alleges base members harassed both him and his family.

Two Nova Scotia veterans are calling for an inquiry into what the first ombudsman for the Canadian Forces once called a "systemic" problem of racism in the military.

Rubin Coward, a Royal Canadian Air Force veteran, and Wally Fowler, a Canadian Forces veteran, are calling for a public inquiry into a problem they say the government has known about for years. Both men, who are black, say they faced racism while serving.

"I cannot, of good conscience — good and clear conscience — encourage any minorities to join the Canadian Armed Forces," Coward told reporters at a news conference in Halifax on Thursday.

Coward said he developed post-traumatic stress disorder and had to leave the military in 1995 due to "constant" racial taunts and discrimination.

"He was just really angry all the time. He suffered from a lot of flashbacks and sleep disorders," said Deborah Coward, Rubin's wife.

Fowler said eight years later, the same thing happened to him, his wife and children.


Royal Canadian Air Force veteran Rubin Coward says he developed PTSD and had to leave the forces in 1995 due to racial taunts and discrimination.

"I had base members driving by, giving my little girl the finger, destroying their property — it was just one thing after another," said Fowler.

Coward and Fowler are calling for a public inquiry into what they claim is widespread racism in the military. They said the federal government had known about the issue since 2005 or earlier.

'Systemic' problems in military

The veterans used the Access to Information Act to obtain a letter sent in June 2005 by André Marin, the first ombudsman of the Canadian Forces, to Defence Minister Bill Graham about Fowler's case.

"We have identified two systemic issues that could be pursued further, the first being: what is the CF's role and responsibility with respect to assisting with the integration of members and their dependants, specifically those that are visible minorities, into the community," said the letter.

"The second issue concerns CF's policy with respect to independent or higher level review of harassment complaints and more specifically of racism, with the aim of identifying systemic racism or discrimination.

"At present, the existing policies are either silent or lacking."

Dennis Manuge, who won his own disability pension fight against the federal government in 2012, has thrown his support behind the veterans' cause. He said a public inquiry would be better but doesn't rule out a possible legal challenge.

"It is difficult to get legal representation when you're the little man or the little woman," he said.

Coward said now is the time for past and present members to speak out.

"We've been fortunate enough to garner Dennis's support and show a collective effort here that we're no longer complaining by virtue that we're simply minorities," he said.

"We're complaining because we're Canadians, human beings."

Maureen Lamothe, a spokeswoman for the Department of National Defence, said the Canadian military treats discrimination complaints seriously, and has a zero-tolerance policy on discrimination for all members.

She said between 2001 and 2012, there were 290 cases of racism complaints within the Canadian Forces and 129 of those cases were won by the complainants. The information for 2013 is not yet available, Lamothe said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/systemic-racism-in-canadian-forces-needs-inquiry-veterans-say-1.2571614

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Ex-military members claim systemic racism in lawsuit

Post by Trooper on Thu 22 Dec 2016, 17:54

Ex-military members claim systemic racism in lawsuit

Called 'porch monkey,' wife pelted with bananas, threatened to be burned, ex members say

By Chloé Fedio, CBC News Posted: Dec 22, 2016 4:05 PM ET Last Updated: Dec 22, 2016 4:05 PM ET

Three former members of the Canadian Forces have filed a proposed class action lawsuit claming "systemic racial discrimination and harassment" during their service, detailing how derogatory slurs and threats of violence against them were either ignored or tolerated by their superiors.

Marc Frenette, a 38-year-old Aboriginal man from Ontario, Wallace Fowler, a 43-year-old black man from Nova Scotia, and Jean-Pierre Robillard, a black man of Haitian decent raised in New Brunswick, made the accusations against the Canadian Forces in a statement of claim filed Dec. 14 in Halifax, N.S. Fowler has previously called for an inquiry into racism in the military.

"Rather than properly punishing the wrongdoers and deterring insidious behaviour, victims of racism within the Canadian Forces are forced into isolation, subjected to further trauma and, in many cases, catapulted toward early release from their careers," according to the claim.

The statement of claim says people enroll in the Canadian Forces "to protect and advance the ideals that Canada purports to uphold" — including equality, and the right to live and work in a tolerant environment that "fosters human dignity."

"But unfortunately, the Canadian Forces has failed to look after its own with respect to these most basic human rights," the claim goes on to say. "From top to bottom, the Canadian Forces has failed to protect racial minorities and Aboriginal peoples from racism within the ranks."

The allegations have not been proven in court.

Told to 'laugh it off'

Frenette, who maintained the iconic Royal Canadian Air Force Snowbirds in Moose Jaw, Sask., didn't have any issues in the military until other members found out he was Aboriginal in his fifth year of service, according to the statement of claim. He was then treated differently, including denied requests for leave and additional training that were granted to other members.


Marc Frenette said he was subjected to years of racist abuse while a serving member of the Royal Canadian Air Force.

When he transferred to a helicopter squadron at the base in Petawawa, Ont., in 2013, he was called "lazy" and told he "abused the system" because that's "what all Aboriginal people do;" he was asked if his wife got drunk before sex because "a drunken Indian is a better lay;" and other members would "pat their hands against their mouths and state, 'oh, oh, oh,'" when he passed, among other taunts, according to the statement of claim.

When he reported the abuse to superiors, he was told to "laugh it off," according to the claim. The abuse continued, including a threat by another member in Feb. 2015, who held a lighter between Frenette's leg's and told other members, "time to burn this Indian before he burns any more wagons," the claim details. That same month, he requested a transfer, detailing in a memorandum the harassment he had endured at the base in Petawawa.

An investigation was launched, during which Frenette was isolated from other members, and in April 2015 the commanding officer of his squadron found there was a "breakdown in leadership," the claim said.

The commanding officer wrote in a memorandum: "I am appalled at the lack of immediate and swift action" in response to the "ethnic discrimination," the claim detailed.

He was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and extreme stress disorder as a result of the discrimination and harassment in the military, the claim detailed. He was released from the military in February 2016.

Wife pelted with bananas

​Racial harassment against Fowler began in 2000 when he was posted to CFB Borden to train as a vehicle technician — including racist nicknames and jokes, being denied administrative time that was allowed for other members, and being denied food, shelter and proper clothing in severe weather, according to the statement of claim.


Canadian Forces veteran Wallace Fowler alleges base members harassed both he and his family.

After he filed a complaint, he was "inappropriately coerced by his superiors into dropping the complaint," the claim detailed.

Harassment continued against Fowler and his family when he was posted to CFB Esquimalt in B.C., in August 2001.

"His stepchildren were spat on, subjected to drive-by verbal assaults, put off the school bus and denied lunch in the cafeteria. His spouse had bananas thrown at her while walking home on the base, and members often refused to be served by her at the shop where she worked," the claim detailed.

Despite fears for the safety of his family, his concerns were "cast aside as falling beyond the responsibility of the Canadian Forces," the claim said.

The claim detailed that a social work officer found that since none of the discrimination happened "in direct relation to his duty or in his workplace," it could be argued the military cannot be held "directly responsible" for it. Still the worker recommended Fowler be posted to a unit near Halifax, which is close to his extended family.

"With the help of a supportive extended family and community, the Fowlers could learn to better tolerate racial discrimination they might encounter at another posting," the worker said, according to the claim. Instead, Fowler was relocated to CFB Trenton, where harassment and discrimination continued, the claim detailed.

As "ridicule and isolation" continued for months, he was referred to a psychologist and diagnosed with major depressive disorder and racial abuse, the claim detailed. He was released early from the Canadian Forced as being "not advantageously employable," which limited his future job options, the claim detailed.

No formal investigation was conducted.

Called a 'porch monkey'

Robillard served in the reserve force in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia "without incident," but "everything changed" when he transferred to the regular force in 2005, the claim detailed.

While posted at CFB Winnipeg, his unit went on a training exercise at a United States air force base in Greenland. After raising concerns about "rampant" alcohol abuse by members of his unit and how that could tarnish Canada's reputation, "Robillard was subjected to a persistent stream of racially-motivated harassment, discrimination and bullying by other members," the claim detailed.

When the unit returned to Winnipeg he was routinely referred to as "the n---er," and called "useless" and "stupid" by other members, the claim detailed. When he reported the harassment to his superior, he was told to just punch the offending member out, the claim said. Even after reporting a racially-motivated physical assault, no action was taken, the claim said.

After he reported that other members put a sticker on the back of his vehicle that said, "F--- me, I'm gay," his commanding officer called a section meeting to tell the members to "knock it off," the claim detailed.

When the devastating earthquake hit Haiti in January 2010 — the whereabouts of his mother were initially unknown but she was eventually found alive — he joined the relief effort but discrimination continued abroad, the claim detailed.

After asking for advice to help his mother immigrated to Canada, Robillard overhead a captain say he would "never help out that monkey and his foul mother" and that Canadians had "done enough for these n---ers," the claim detailed. The captain also called them both "porch monkeys," the claim said.

Robillard was diagnosed with severed post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive episodes, the claim detailed.

He was released from the Canadian Forces in July 2012 after being found "unsuitable for further services" and an "administrative burden," which limited his future job options, the claim said.

Proposed class action

The three plaintiffs are seeking to certify their case as a class action to represent all Canadian Forces members who identify as "racial minorities, visible minorities or Aboriginal peoples."

The plaintiffs claim damages for their ongoing psychological and physical injuries, as well as for loss of earning and benefits professionally. A dollar figure is not specified.

The plaintiffs also seek "punitive, exemplary and aggravated damages based on the abusive and reprehensible misconduct of the Canadian Forces and those Crown servants who have shown a callous disregard for the plantiffs' and class members' rights, dignity, health and safety."

The plaintiffs request that the case be tried in Halifax.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/canadian-military-systemic-racism-class-action-suit-1.3909258
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Three Canadian veterans allege systemic racism in military

Post by Trooper on Fri 23 Dec 2016, 16:03

Three Canadian veterans allege systemic racism in military

The former members filed a proposed class action against the military, claiming verbal taunts, racial epithets and insults to family members

Alison Auld, The Canadian Press

December 23, 2016

HALIFAX — Three veterans say they endured years of racist abuse in the Canadian Forces, including slurs about aboriginals and blacks that were allegedly ignored by superior officers.

The former members have filed a proposed class action lawsuit against the military in Federal Court in Halifax. They claim they were subjected to verbal taunts, racial epithets and insults to family members — including one incident in which someone threw bananas at a black member’s spouse on the base in Esquimalt, B.C.

The suit, filed by Marc Frenette, Wallace Fowler and Jean-Pierre Robillard on Dec. 14, accuses superior officers of brushing off the behaviour by “silencing the wrongs” and urging some members not to file complaints.

“From top to bottom, the Canadian Forces has failed to protect racial minorities and aboriginal people from racism within the ranks,” the 31-page document states.

“Derogatory slurs, racial harassment and violent threats are tolerated or ignored …. Victims of racism within the Canadian Forces are forced into isolation, subjected to
further trauma and, in many cases, catapulted toward early release.”

Frenette, a 39-year-old from Ontario, claims his career in aircraft maintenance with the Snowbirds 431 squadron was going well until colleagues in Moose Jaw, Sask., discovered he is aboriginal.

He alleges that led to racial slurs, rejected requests for leave and training, physical abuse and insults about his heritage. One member allegedly said in front of an officer that Frenette was lazy and abused the system, because that’s “what all aboriginal people do.”

Frenette, who was released from the Forces last February, described one encounter in 2015 when another member allegedly grabbed him from behind and held a lighter between his legs while other members watched, saying “time to burn this Indian before he burns any more wagons.”

Frenette, who has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder linked to the treatment, alleges he was told by superiors to laugh off the behaviour and not take his complaints up the chain of command. The claim states that Frenette was assured harassment training would be provided to that flight section, but that it never materialized.

Defence spokesman Evan Koronewski said in an email that the Forces are aware of the proposed suit and are reviewing the allegations.

The court document states that Fowler, a 43-year-old black man from Nova Scotia, was exposed to racist harassment soon after he was posted to Canadian Forces Base Borden to be trained as a vehicle technician. He alleges he was called racist names and denied adequate food, shelter and clothing on the basis of his race.

Fowler claims the racist behaviour worsened when he and his family were relocated to CFB Esquimalt in 2001, when his step-children were allegedly spat on, verbally abused and denied lunch in the cafeteria, while his spouse had bananas tossed at her on the base.

Fowler says the Forces did nothing to address his concerns, saying the incidents were not directly related to his duty or workplace.

Soon after, he was transferred to CFB Trenton, where he alleges the abuse continued. As a result ongoing “ridicule and isolation,” Fowler claimed he was diagnosed with a serious psychological illness. He was released from the Forces at age 30 and deemed “not advantageously employable,” the suit states.
Robillard, a black man from Haiti who was raised in New Brunswick, alleges he was routinely called racial slurs by his unit members and that when he complained to his commanding officer, he was assigned to latrine and cleaning duty.

In 2010, he volunteered to go to Haiti to help in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake. He claims that soon after he arrived, he determined his mother had been located in Haiti and he began arranging to have her reunited with him in the Dominican Republic.

Robillard said he asked an officer about helping his mother immigrate to Canada, and claims a captain made several insulting remarks, referring to the pair as “porch monkeys” and using the n-word.

He said he complained, but the military took no action.

“It has done nothing more than silence the wrongs, further isolate Robillard and protect and insulate the culture of racism within the Canadian Forces,” the suit claims.

None of the allegations in the claim have been tested in court. The suit does not indicate the amount of punitive damages being sought by the plaintiffs.

http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/three-canadian-veterans-allege-systemic-racism-in-military/
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Veterans accuse military of throwing bananas at blacks, threatening to burn indigenous member in lawsuit

Post by Trooper on Sun 25 Dec 2016, 09:09

Veterans accuse military of throwing bananas at blacks, threatening to burn indigenous member in lawsuit

Alison Auld, The Canadian Press

December 23, 2016 | Last Updated: Dec 23 4:07 PM ET


The former soldiers claim they were subjected to verbal taunts, racial epithets and insults to family members

HALIFAX — Three veterans say they endured years of racist abuse in the Canadian Forces, including slurs about aboriginals and blacks that were allegedly ignored by superior officers.

The former members have filed a proposed class action lawsuit against the military in Federal Court in Halifax. They claim they were subjected to verbal taunts, racial epithets and insults to family members — including one incident in which someone threw bananas at a black member’s spouse on the base in Esquimalt, B.C.

Victims of racism within the Canadian Forces are forced into isolation, subjected to further trauma and, in many cases, catapulted toward early release

The suit, filed by Marc Frenette, Wallace Fowler and Jean-Pierre Robillard on Dec. 14, accuses superior officers of brushing off the behaviour by “silencing the wrongs” and urging some members not to file complaints.

“From top to bottom, the Canadian Forces has failed to protect racial minorities and aboriginal people from racism within the ranks,” the 31-page document states.

“Derogatory slurs, racial harassment and violent threats are tolerated or ignored …. Victims of racism within the Canadian Forces are forced into isolation, subjected to further trauma and, in many cases, catapulted toward early release.”


Commanders salute during National Day of Honour ceremonies at CFB Edmonton in Edmonton, Alta., on Friday, May 9, 2014. The cross-Canada event was held in recognition of the Canadian military's contributions to the military mission in Afghanistan.

Frenette, a 39-year-old from Ontario, claims his career in aircraft maintenance with the Snowbirds 431 squadron was going well until colleagues in Moose Jaw, Sask., discovered he is aboriginal.

He alleges that led to racial slurs, rejected requests for leave and training, physical abuse and insults about his heritage. One member allegedly said in front of an officer that Frenette was lazy and abused the system, because that’s “what all aboriginal people do.”

Frenette, who was released from the Forces last February, described one encounter in 2015 when another member allegedly grabbed him from behind and held a lighter between his legs while other members watched, saying “time to burn this Indian before he burns any more wagons.”

Frenette, who has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder linked to the treatment, alleges he was told by superiors to laugh off the behaviour and not take his complaints up the chain of command. The claim states that Frenette was assured harassment training would be provided to that flight section, but that it never materialized.

Defence spokesman Evan Koronewski said in an email that the Forces are aware of the proposed suit and are reviewing the allegations.



The court document states that Fowler, a 43-year-old black man from Nova Scotia, was exposed to racist harassment soon after he was posted to Canadian Forces Base Borden to be trained as a vehicle technician. He alleges he was called racist names and denied adequate food, shelter and clothing on the basis of his race.

Fowler claims the racist behaviour worsened when he and his family were relocated to CFB Esquimalt in 2001, when his step-children were allegedly spat on, verbally abused and denied lunch in the cafeteria, while his spouse had bananas tossed at her on the base.

Fowler says the Forces did nothing to address his concerns, saying the incidents were not directly related to his duty or workplace.

Soon after, he was transferred to CFB Trenton, where he alleges the abuse continued. As a result ongoing “ridicule and isolation,” Fowler claimed he was diagnosed with a serious psychological illness. He was released from the Forces at age 30 and deemed “not advantageously employable,” the suit states.

Robillard, a black man from Haiti who was raised in New Brunswick, alleges he was routinely called racial slurs by his unit members and that when he complained to his commanding officer, he was assigned to latrine and cleaning duty.

In 2010, he volunteered to go to Haiti to help in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake. He claims that soon after he arrived, he determined his mother had been located in Haiti and he began arranging to have her reunited with him in the Dominican Republic.

Robillard said he asked an officer about helping his mother immigrate to Canada, and claims a captain made several insulting remarks, referring to the pair as “porch monkeys” and using the n-word.

He said he complained, but the military took no action.

“It has done nothing more than silence the wrongs, further isolate Robillard and protect and insulate the culture of racism within the Canadian Forces,” the suit claims.

None of the allegations in the claim have been tested in court. The suit does not indicate the amount of punitive damages being sought by the plaintiffs.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/ex-soldiers-accuse-military-of-throwing-bananas-at-blacks-threatening-to-burn-indigenous-member-in-racism-lawsuit[/b]
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