Vet with PTSD from Afgan, kills 3 family members and himself

Page 3 of 4 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Veterans ombudsman refocuses review after Nova Scotia tragedy

Post by Guest on Fri 13 Jan 2017, 06:48

Veterans ombudsman refocuses review after Nova Scotia tragedy

Triple murder-suicide raises questions about ability of local hospitals to access federal vets support

By Murray Brewster, CBC News Posted: Jan 12, 2017 5:44 PM ET Last Updated: Jan 12, 2017 5:44 PM ET


Canada's veterans ombudsman, Guy Parent, has indicated he intends to look at 'discrepancies' in care for veterans in different parts of the country, in light of a triple murder-suicide involving a former soldier.

Canada's veterans ombudsman says the gap between the federal government and the provinces when it comes to delivering services to troubled ex-soldiers in rural areas deserves more examination.

The remarks from Guy Parent come in the wake of last week's apparent triple murder and suicide in northern Nova Scotia involving a veteran of the Afghan war who was struggling with mental illness.

Veterans Affairs and the RCMP have been less than forthcoming about the circumstances that led retired corporal Lionel Desmond, 33, to kill his 31-year-old wife, Shanna, his 52-year-old mother, Brenda, and his 10-year-old daughter, Aaliyah.

'It is a tragedy that forces us to look at the overall mental health strategy.'
- Guy Parent, veterans ombudsman


His family has said he "succumbed to the tortures" of post traumatic stress disorder following his service in Afghanistan in 2007.

They have also said that Desmond was turned away when he tried to check himself into St. Martha's Regional Hospital in Antigonish, N.S., located a short drive from his home in Upper Big Tracadie.

But Dr. Minoli Amit, a senior official at the hospital, has denied the claim, saying staff routinely work through bed shortages to provide care to anyone seeking help.


Lionel Desmond's sister says he went to hospital for help the day before apparent murder-suicide

Discrepancies probed

Nonetheless, Parent said he is aware of discrepancies and uneven levels of service across the country.

Soldiers are able to access medical care within the military while still in uniform, but they are at the mercy of provincial health care systems once they are out, and service levels vary.

"It is a tragedy that forces us to look at the overall mental health strategy," Parent told CBC News. He said he intends to refocus an ongoing review of long-term care for veterans towards mental health, an assessment that could see him tap into existing relationships with provincial ombudsmen.

Parent said tough questions need to be asked about how much local and regional hospitals know about the complex federal support system that's been set up to serve both existing military members and veterans.


Shanna and Lionel Desmond hold their daughter Aaliyah in a photo from the Facebook page of Shanna Desmond.

Veterans Affairs, in co-operation with several provincial health departments, has established 11 Operational Stress Injury Clinics across the country, most of which offer outpatient services, and has poured tens of millions of dollars into treatment programs.

In 2009, the former Conservative government opened a 10-bed inpatient facility for veterans at Ste. Anne's Hospital in Montreal.

In conjunction with the veterans department, National Defence has a network of 30 mental health clinics and seven Operational Trauma and Stress Support Centres, which vary in size.

Whether the federal government should be funding more inpatient mental health centres for veterans is an issue that has been repeatedly raised before parliamentary committees.

Secret reviews

Both Veterans Affairs and the military have conducted separate reviews of how they handled Lionel Desmond's case, according to a number of federal sources.

But, citing privacy, they refuse to discuss the findings, or answer questions about what services were offered to the former soldier, who was released from the military on medical grounds 18 months before the tragedy.

Gary Walbourne, the country's military ombudsman, who deals with matters related to serving members of the military, said in the immediate aftermath of the shooting the case could represent a failure of the transition system, which is meant to guide soldiers and their families safely and securely out of uniform.


The flag-draped coffin of Lionel Desmond is carried into St. Peter's Church in Tracadie, N.S. on Wednesday. RCMP say Desmond killed his mother, wife and young daughter before taking his own life earlier in the month.

There have been a number of cases recently where ex-soldiers have waited months for benefits and services, including mental health treatment and financial support.

Parent wasn't prepared to fully endorse his colleague's statement, but said there is merit to the idea that bad transitions increase stress on soldiers.

Funerals for Desmond and his family were held this week.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/vets-ombudsman-desmond-1.3933270

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

No inquiry into former soldier's murder-suicide, N.S. medical examiner says

Post by Guest on Mon 05 Jun 2017, 15:18



No inquiry into former soldier's murder-suicide, N.S. medical examiner says


Michael MacDonald, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, June 5, 2017 9:34AM ADT
Last Updated Monday, June 5, 2017 3:36PM ADT


HALIFAX -- Nova Scotia's medical examiner has ruled out conducting a fatality inquiry into a horrific murder suicide involving a former Canadian soldier who killed his wife, mother and young daughter before killing himself in the family's rural home earlier this year.

Lionel Desmond, a 33-year-old veteran of the war in Afghanistan who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, took his own life after shooting his 52-year-old mother, his wife Shanna, 31, and their 10-year-daughter Aaliyah.

The killings on Jan. 3 in Upper Tracadie, N.S., prompted a difficult debate over soldiers with PTSD, domestic violence and what should be done to prevent such tragedies.

Autopsy records have since been handed to the family's nearest relatives, but medical examiner Dr. Matt Bowes has decided not to conduct an investigation under the province's Fatality Investigations Act, spokeswoman Sarah Gillis said in an emailed statement. She did not offer reasons for the decision.

Catherine Hartling, Shanna Desmond's aunt, has renewed her call for some sort of public inquiry, saying other family members want the same thing but are still too distraught to speak out.

"A lot of them are going through a lot of stress right now," Hartling said in an interview from her home, across the street from the house where the four bodies were found. "A lot of them have ... emotional problems."

Hartling said it's a particularly difficult time for the Desmond side of the family because they are preparing for a burial service on June 24 for Lionel Desmond and his mother. A funeral service was held down the road at a large church in Tracadie on Jan. 11.

"We've been all just trying to hang in there," she said, adding that Shanna Desmond and daughter Aaliyah are to be buried in August.
Despite her profound grief -- compounded by the fact that her 47-year-old sister died in March -- Hartling said she is still looking for answers to some tough questions about what happened to Lionel Desmond. She said she raised the issue with the RCMP at a meeting in March.

"I was telling them that I would like to see an inquiry take place into this," she said. "I haven't heard nothing."

Desmond served in Afghanistan in 2007, and had received treatment from a joint personnel support unit in New Brunswick for a year prior to his release from the military. Such units provide support to ill and injured soldiers, including mental injuries.

Neither National Defence nor Veterans Affairs Canada have committed to investigating the treatment Desmond received before and after his release from the military in July 2015.

Immediately after the killings, some of Lionel Desmond's relatives said he was not getting the help he needed once he returned home. Questions were also raised about the care he received at the hospital in nearby Antigonish, N.S., which has its own mental health unit.
At the time, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil said an investigation would look into how the province's health-care system dealt with Desmond.

However, a spokeswoman for the Nova Scotia Health Authority said the "quality review" would not be released to the public.
"That is a confidential process focused on learning and improving," Kristen Lipscombe said in an email.
PTSD has been the top diagnosis for the hundreds of troops released from the military for medical reasons each year since at least 2014. Some 18 military personnel took their own lives in 2015, many of whom had sought some type of mental-health treatment shortly before their deaths.

The Canadian Forces and Veterans Affairs have opened specialized clinics, hired more staff and cut red tape in recent years to provide better care and support as more military personnel have come forward seeking help for PTSD and other disorders.
But some critics wonder whether Ottawa has done enough.

On the same day relatives discovered the slain family members, Canada's military watchdog urged the federal government do more for soldiers forced out of the Canadian Forces for medical reasons.

Ombudsman Gary Walbourne said he wants Ottawa to ensure injured military personnel have all the necessary benefits and supports in place before they are forced to turn in their uniforms. He also said significant barriers persist in terms of accessing services and benefits.

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/no-inquiry-into-former-soldier-s-murder-suicide-n-s-medical-examiner-says-1.3443844



Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Decision not to hold inquiry into veteran’s murder-suicide sparks anger

Post by Guest on Tue 06 Jun 2017, 05:02

Decision not to hold inquiry into veteran’s murder-suicide sparks anger

MICHAEL MACDONALD
HALIFAX — The Canadian Press
Published Monday, Jun. 05, 2017 8:14PM EDT
Last updated Monday, Jun. 05, 2017 8:16PM EDT



When former Canadian soldier Lionel Desmond died by suicide after killing his wife, mother and young daughter earlier this year, Gregory Swiatkowski read about the tragedy and imagined the same thing happening to him.

“This could have been me,” the former member of the Royal Canadian Navy said. “And there’s a lot of veterans who feel the same way across the country.”

Mr. Swiatkowski served in Halifax as a sonar technician between 2002 and 2012 before he was medically discharged, having been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder in 2008

On Monday, he said he felt compelled to speak out about his experience after he learned Nova Scotia’s medical examiner had ruled out conducting a fatality inquiry into the four shooting deaths.

Mr. Desmond, a 33-year-old veteran of the war in Afghanistan who suffered from PTSD, took his own life after shooting his 52-year-old mother, his wife, Shanna, 31, and their 10-year-daughter, Aaliyah.

The killings on Jan. 3 in Upper Tracadie, N.S., prompted a difficult debate over soldiers with PTSD, domestic violence and what should be done to prevent such tragedies.

Autopsy records have since been handed to the family’s nearest relatives, but medical examiner Matt Bowes has decided not to conduct an investigation under the province’s Fatality Investigations Act, spokeswoman Sarah Gillis said in an e-mailed statement. She did not offer reasons for the decision.

Mr. Swiatkowski, who uses a service dog and medical marijuana to deal with his PTSD, said the decision made him furious.

“We’ve been waiting for some answers for a long time on this,” he said in an interview from his home in Kelowna, B.C. “When I was reading this story from Nova Scotia, I was ready to snap … We deserve better than this. This can’t be just swept under the carpet.”

Catherine Hartling, Shanna Desmond’s aunt, has renewed her call for some sort of public inquiry, saying other family members want the same thing but are still too distraught to speak out.

“A lot of them are going through a lot of stress right now,” Ms. Hartling said in an interview from her home, across the street from the house where the four bodies were found. “A lot of them have … emotional problems.”

Ms. Hartling said it’s a particularly difficult time for the Desmond side of the family because they are preparing for a burial service on June 24 for Lionel Desmond and his mother, Brenda. A funeral service was held down the road at a large church in Tracadie on Jan. 11.

“We’ve been all just trying to hang in there,” she said, adding that Shanna Desmond and daughter Aaliyah are to be buried in August.

Despite her profound grief – compounded by the fact that her 47-year-old sister died in March – Ms. Hartling said she is still looking for answers to some tough questions about what happened to Lionel Desmond. She said she raised the issue with the RCMP at a meeting in March.

“I was telling them that I would like to see an inquiry take place into this,” she said. “I haven’t heard nothing.”

Mr. Desmond served in Afghanistan in 2007, and had received treatment from a joint personnel support unit in New Brunswick for a year prior to his release from the military. Such units provide support to ill and injured soldiers, including those with mental injuries.

Neither National Defence nor Veterans Affairs Canada have committed to investigating the treatment Mr. Desmond received before and after his release from the military in July, 2015.

Immediately after the killings, some of Mr. Desmond’s relatives said he was not getting the help he needed once he returned home. Questions were also raised about the care he received at the hospital in nearby Antigonish, N.S., which has its own mental-health unit.

At the time, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil said an investigation would look into how the province’s health-care system dealt with Mr. Desmond.

However, a spokeswoman for the Nova Scotia Health Authority said the “quality review” would not be released to the public.

“That is a confidential process focused on learning and improving,” Kristen Lipscombe said in an e-mail.

PTSD has been the top diagnosis for the hundreds of troops released from the military for medical reasons each year since at least 2014. Some 18 military personnel took their own lives in 2015, many of whom had sought some type of mental-health treatment shortly before their deaths.

The Canadian Forces and Veterans Affairs have opened specialized clinics, hired more staff and cut red tape in recent years to provide better care and support as more military personnel have come forward seeking help for PTSD and other disorders.

But some critics wonder whether Ottawa has done enough.

On the same day relatives discovered the slain members of the Desmond family, Canada’s military watchdog urged the federal government do more for soldiers forced out of the Canadian Forces for medical reasons.

Ombudsman Gary Walbourne said he wants Ottawa to ensure injured military personnel have all the necessary benefits and supports in place before they are forced to turn in their uniforms. He also said significant barriers persist in terms of accessing services and benefits.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/decision-not-to-hold-inquiry-into-veterans-murder-suicide-sparks-anger/article35210864/


Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Veterans advocate pushes for inquiry into murder-suicide involving former Canadian soldier

Post by Guest on Wed 07 Jun 2017, 05:34

Veterans advocate pushes for inquiry into murder-suicide involving former Canadian soldier


Video: http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1140726

CTV Atlantic
Published Tuesday, June 6, 2017 7:10PM ADT
Last Updated Tuesday, June 6, 2017 7:16PM ADT


A well know veterans advocate is calling for an inquiry into the death of Lionel Desmond and his family.

The 33-year-old fatally shot his wife, daughter and mother before turning the gun on himself earlier this year

Former MP Peter Stoffer says the decision not to hold a judicial inquiry makes him suspicious.

“This is either a cost factor, there's money involved, or they don't want to know the truth, and they're protecting somebody," says Stoffer.

The decision not to open an inquiry was made by Nova Scotia’s Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Matt Bowes. He says the major issue in the case was the provision of mental health services.

"It's my understanding that that review had been conducted. Actually, I've had information that the Nova Scotia Health Authority is setting up a meeting right now with the family to talk about recommendations," says Bowes.

Veterans Emergency Transition Services (VETS) is a nonprofit in Halifax that aids homeless veterans and veterans in crisis. They say peer support is crucial for those leaving the military and much more could be done.

“One of the disappointments for us was the fact that we didn't have the opportunity to assist this veteran before he got to that level of crisis,” says Debbie Lowther, VETS Canada co-founder. “We’d like to see that maybe everybody who's released is assigned a peer, you know? A buddy system or something to check to make sure the buddy's doing ok."

Peter Stoffer says a judicial inquiry would shed light on the inner workings of many organizations includingthe Department of National Defence, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Nova Scotia health system, and the mental health care system.

"Was he getting all the treatment in a timely fashion? Was his family being looked after? Were there any recorded incidences that the police might have known about? What role did the hospital in Antigonish play in all of this?" questions Stoffer.

He says the only way an inquiry can be forced now is through public pressure.

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/veterans-advocate-pushes-for-inquiry-into-murder-suicide-involving-former-canadian-soldier-1.3446579





Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Inquiry Demanded by All Canadians

Post by Dannypaj on Thu 08 Jun 2017, 04:51

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/murder-suicide-upper-big-tracadie-inquiry-military-1.4150122

Anyone injured and sent to SPHL and then medically released?
How long before VAC reached out and helped you?
For me, "it took 8 years of appeals" for any sort of help....wonder where he was in the process???
0 help from DND, nor SISIP or VAC ! (That is financial and medical and running around undiagnosed as well for years).
YES please,, WE WANT AN INQUIRY!!!
avatar
Dannypaj
CSAT Member

Number of posts : 1108
Age : 40
Location : Halifax
Registration date : 2015-01-29

Back to top Go down

N.S. medical examiner open to inquiry in soldier's death if hospital review weak

Post by Guest on Thu 08 Jun 2017, 16:39

N.S. medical examiner open to inquiry in soldier's death if hospital review weak


THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published June 8, 2017 - 2:34pm
Last Updated June 8, 2017 - 4:56pm




HALIFAX — Nova Scotia’s medical examiner says he’ll consider ordering a public inquiry into the death of a former Canadian soldier who fatally shot his wife, daughter and mother if a provincial review of the man’s mental health treatment doesn’t lead to changes.

The provincial Justice Department had provided a statement last week stating Dr. Matthew Bowes had decided against ordering a judicial inquiry into the death of Lionel Desmond, a 33-year-old veteran of the war in Afghanistan who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder.

But Bowes clarified Thursday that if he concludes a hospital review of Desmond’s treatment was incomplete, he’d consider using his rarely exercised power to call for a judicial inquiry under the province’s Fatality Inquiries Act.

“Certainly, for me, it’s a ‘No’ right now because for me it doesn’t make sense to order a public policy renewal mechanism when there’s already one occurring,” he said in a telephone interview.

“But I’ll be watching the results of that (review) very thoroughly, and if it’s not satisfactory and it’s not comprehensive, if it’s not fulsome and it doesn’t result in recommendations and if it doesn’t result in system change I’m certainly willing to re-examine that issue.”

Desmond took his own life after shooting his 52-year-old mother, his wife Shanna, 31, and their 10-year-old daughter Aaliyah.

The Jan. 3 killings in Upper Tracadie, N.S., prompted a difficult debate over soldiers with PTSD, domestic violence and what should be done to prevent such tragedies.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/canada/1476158-update-n.s.-medical-examiner-open-to-inquiry-in-soldiers-death-if-hospital-review-wea






Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Vet with PTSD from Afgan, kills 3 family members and himself

Post by Teentitan on Thu 08 Jun 2017, 16:56

I have to admit I do not like the fact that the Nova Scotia Health Care is taking a beating over this is so wrong.

At what point is a reporter going to make a point that VAC is the system that failed a veteran?
avatar
Teentitan
CSAT Member

Number of posts : 3271
Location : ontario
Registration date : 2008-09-19

Back to top Go down

Re: Vet with PTSD from Afgan, kills 3 family members and himself

Post by RCN-Retired on Thu 08 Jun 2017, 22:58

Agree Teen, this is 100% on DND and VAC, how the heck would a provincial health system know the DND were releasing ticking accidents waiting to happen fully aware that VAC are also failing veterans. This is all on our jackass minister and a retired CDS that remains failing troops.
avatar
RCN-Retired
CSAT Member

Number of posts : 251
Location : Vancouver Island
Registration date : 2012-11-14

Back to top Go down

Re: Vet with PTSD from Afgan, kills 3 family members and himself

Post by Teentitan on Thu 08 Jun 2017, 23:55

Well the provinces are not upset about the federal gov't "downloading" vets on their healthcare systems because vets are cash to them.

Every year each province submits their bills, doctor/specialists drugs inhome nursing, and the gov't pays I believe up to 75% to the province.   These payments are above the yearly health transfers Ottawa sends to each province every year. So like I said vets are cash to provinces.

It's time for the provinces to either demand more compensation to prepare their systems to help vets or they fight back and tell the federal gov't to take care of their vets.
avatar
Teentitan
CSAT Member

Number of posts : 3271
Location : ontario
Registration date : 2008-09-19

Back to top Go down

Re: Vet with PTSD from Afgan, kills 3 family members and himself

Post by pinger on Fri 09 Jun 2017, 13:14

Not to assume anything, but if the federal government is entertaining pawning us to the provinces (think money) it would be even worse imo. That's a no brainer, Provincial health care is already overwhelmed and has failings.

But irregardless of all the money in the world for VaC, it has to be used very smartly for our QoL and well being. Not some dummied down job creation version where the money and support goes sideways.

Hope I made sense.
avatar
pinger
CSAT Member

Number of posts : 1232
Location : Facebook-less
Registration date : 2014-03-04

Back to top Go down

Veteran who killed family was cleared for gun licence, despite suicide concerns

Post by Guest on Fri 16 Jun 2017, 16:57

Veteran who killed family was cleared for gun licence, despite suicide concerns


Lionel Desmond fatally shot three family members and killed himself in January in Upper Big Tracadie, N.S.

By Sherri Borden Colley, Karissa Donkin, CBC News June 16, 2017


Lionel Desmond's sister, Cassandra Desmond, holds up a doctor's letter recommending that her brother attend the gym and yoga to help with his severe post-traumatic stress disorder.

A Nova Scotia family is frustrated with a lack of answers about whether a former Canadian soldier got proper help for severe mental-health problems in the months before he fatally shot three members of his family and himself.

Afghanistan war veteran Lionel Desmond, 33, killed his 52-year-old mother Brenda, his wife Shanna, 31, and their 10-year-old daughter Aaliyah, in the family's Upper Big Tracadie, N.S., home on Jan. 3.

Desmond's family has provided CBC News with documents that offer a glimpse into the year leading up to the deaths.

Still, many of the family's questions remain unanswered.

According to a medical assessment obtained by CBC News, a Fredericton family doctor determined Desmond was "non-suicidal and stable" and that he had "no concerns for firearms usage" in February 2016, three months after Desmond's wife called RCMP to report her husband was threatening to harm himself with a gun.

It's not clear from the documents the status of any gun licence Desmond might have had at the time, but the assessment was done for New Brunswick's Chief Firearms Office.

Firearms officers in each province have the power under federal legislation to revoke a person's firearms licence if they believe the person could harm him or herself or others, based on evidence from medical professionals, police and others.

What changed in those final months


Dr. Paul Smith said Lionel Desmond was stable and doing 'extremely well' a year before his death.

Dr. Paul Smith, the doctor who signed off on the form, told CBC News that Desmond was stable and doing "extremely well" at the time. He had suicidal thoughts in the past, he said, but improved after he began using medical marijuana.

Desmond had served in the war in Afghanistan in 2007 and suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder.

The doctor lost contact with Desmond in the spring of 2016, after the former soldier sought treatment in Ontario and then moved to Nova Scotia.

Smith is struggling to piece together what changed in Desmond's life in those final months.

"We were shocked and saddened, like everybody," Smith said in an interview with CBC News.

"My initial thoughts were, 'He was doing so well. What happened?'"

Desmond threatened to self-harm

On Nov. 27, 2015, RCMP in New Brunswick received a call from Shanna Desmond stating that her husband had sent her text messages saying he was on his way to the garage and was going to use a firearm to harm himself, according to the medical assessment signed by Smith.

'He told her to say goodbye to their daughter and that he would see her in heaven.'
- Desmond's medical assessment


At the time, he was living in New Brunswick while his wife and daughter were living in Nova Scotia.

"He is a military veteran and has PTSD. He told her to say goodbye to their daughter and that he would see her in heaven," the assessment said.

"Police attended the residence; our client met with them and said he did not have any intention of hurting himself, but that he was very depressed. He is concerned for his wellbeing. He was driven to the hospital, where he was seen by a doctor."

RCMP in New Brunswick declined a CBC News request for comment on the incident.

No concerns that Desmond posed risk

On the medical assessment form, Smith checked off that he had no concerns that Lionel Desmond posed a safety risk to himself or others.

The form was also signed by Joe Roper, an area firearms officer with New Brunswick's Department of Public Safety, on Jan. 20, 2016.


A collage of Lionel Desmond, his wife Shanna, mother Brenda and daughter Aaliyah and his military comrades.
Lionel Desmond's sister, Cassandra Desmond, doesn't understand why her brother was permitted a firearms licence.

"What type of physician is still going to sign off and allow a man to have his gun licence if he states that he's concerned for his wellbeing and he was threatening his own life? But you're still going to deem him responsible enough to hold a firearm?" Cassandra Desmond asked in an interview.

New Brunswick's Department of Public Safety declined to comment on the specifics of Lionel Desmond's case, but described it as a "tragic situation."

In an emailed statement, spokesman Paul Bradley said the assessments are taken "very seriously" in accordance with the federal Firearms Act.

"Provincial officials make the determination based on the assessment of the medical professional and the data provided," Bradley wrote.

'He was very stable'

Smith said his assessment would have been one of several pieces of evidence that would have been used to decide whether Lionel Desmond should have firearms.

"My involvement simply was an opinion given at the time that I had known him," Smith said.

"He was very stable."

In the past, Smith said he has told firearms officers that a person with PTSD shouldn't be allowed to have a firearms licence. Other times, he's suggested the person isn't ready and to check back in a few months.

But Smith didn't have those concerns with Lionel Desmond.

Cassandra Desmond speaks about her family's frustration trying to find answers about the help her brother received before he killed three family members and took his own life in January.

The RCMP's firearms licence renewal form asks if the person applying has threatened or attempted suicide in the past five years or suffered from or been diagnosed or treated by a medical practitioner for depression, behavioural or emotional problems or alcohol, drug or substance abuse.

Typically, mental-health concerns are reported by a person's family, law enforcement or a concerned member of the public, according to the RCMP.

But Smith doesn't believe every soldier who's had mental-health issues should be barred from owning firearms.

"Every PTSD soldier has suicidal thoughts. Everybody," Smith said.

"That's part of the definition of [PTSD]. When we first met him, he certainly admitted to having suicidal thoughts in the past, as they all do. With his therapies, it virtually disappeared."


Yoga and gym recommended for PTSD

Lionel Desmond was on prescription drugs prior to being prescribed medical marijuana to treat his PTSD, but his sister does not know what other treatment her brother received before the shootings.

'My initial thoughts were, 'He was doing so well. What Happened?''
- Dr. Paul Smith


A second document shows that just four weeks before the killings, a psychiatrist at St. Martha's Regional Hospital in Antigonish, N.S., recommended Desmond go the gym and do yoga to cope with his severe post-traumatic stress disorder.

"Mr. Desmond has severe problems with PTSD and post-concussion disorder. He would benefit from regular participation in a gym and in yoga but needs financial assistance to afford them," Dr. Ian Slayter, of the hospital's department of psychiatry, wrote in a letter dated Dec. 2, 2016.

"That right there ... just disgusts me," Cassandra Desmond said. "This is how they feel that they should help our veterans."

The family claims that Lionel Desmond was turned away from St. Martha's Regional Hospital in Antigonish one day before the shooting. A doctor at the hospital has previously denied that allegation and said that it has never turned anyone away.


Lionel Desmond was part of India Company, 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment in Afghanistan in 2007

However, Slayter's letter alone leaves Cassandra wondering what other information the Nova Scotia Health Authority "is hiding" that may show her brother was not receiving the help he needed.

Smith also questions whether Lionel Desmond was allowed to continue using medical marijuana during his treatment in Nova Scotia, saying the province is "lagging behind" in accepting it as a valid treatment.

Family waiting for answers

Months after the tragedy, Desmond's family is waiting for answers about what care the former soldier received. They are still trying to set up a meeting with the health authority and say they are frustrated by the lack of response.

'It's not easy ... seeing the people you love suffer in silence.'
- Cassandra Desmond


Slayter was not available for an interview. However, Kristen Lipscombe, a spokesperson for the Nova Scotia Health Authority, said in a statement that the authority has an obligation to protect personal health information under provincial legislation.

The authority cannot answer questions or release details about individuals. And that includes sharing or confirming information related to a person's care or treatment, she said.

Authority says it will meet with family

The health authority completed a quality review into Desmond's dealings with the Nova Scotia health-care system in March. But that report will not be released to the public.

Colin Stevenson, vice-president of quality system performance and transformation with the Nova Scotia Health Authority, confirmed on Friday they are trying to set up a meeting with Desmond's family.

"My understanding, based on conversations to date, is what they would like to be hearing from us includes the results of and the recommendations associated with that quality review and we are prepared to discuss that with the family," Stevenson said in an interview.

Stevenson said the quality review will not be made public because the process is confidential so staff are protected and can be open about any flaws in the system.

"And as a general rule we don't speak to reviews within specific cases," he said. "And good practice within health care across the country is to create an environment where people are willing to disclose incidents and that really is what we're trying to encourage."

Stevenson would not say how many recommendations came out of the review or the nature of those recommendations.

"We'd be having a conversation with the family before any information is shared beyond that," he said.

If asked, the health authority would fully co-operate with a public inquiry, Stevenson said.

Night terrors, cold sweats, fear of water

Cassandra Desmond said her brother had night terrors, cold sweats and was afraid of water for a while after he returned from the war.

"He couldn't be around family too long. I'm not saying he couldn't be around us period," she said.

"He was raised in a large family and a loud family and … just loud noises, and stuff like that, anything loud or even sudden whispers, would remind him of, say, for an example, trees [rustling]."

Lionel Desmond went from a carefree, down-to-earth, free-spirited person — the family comedian — to "fight or flight" and just constantly feeling that he was mentally under attack by things, his sister recalled.

"And, there were days, you know, where he could still be that happy-go-lucky guy, but then anything could have triggered off to … things that relayed back to whatever it is that he discovered and seen and went through over on the grounds of Afghanistan," Cassandra Desmond said. "It's not easy … seeing the people you love suffer in silence."


Lionel Desmond and his mother Brenda Desmond were two of four family members that died in a murder-suicide in Upper Big Tracadie, N.S., in January.

In New Brunswick, Smith thinks about his former patient every day.

So do many of the clients in his office who are struggling with PTSD and coming to terms with the decisions Lionel Desmond made.

"I would love to have known what was going through his head in that last few months or weeks or days or whatever it was that he came to that kind of conclusion," Smith said.

"I wish that more people had been there for him and he didn't feel alone like he did. He must have felt extremely distraught and alone in the world in order to make that kind of decision."

No decision on fatality inquiry

Last week, Dr. Matthew Bowes, Nova Scotia's chief medical examiner, said he'll consider ordering a public inquiry into Desmond's death under the province's Fatality Inquiries Act, if a provincial review of Desmond's mental-health treatment isn't adequate. Bowes also said he will consider family members' views on the issue.

Bowes also was not available for an interview. However, his office issued a statement through the Justice Department.

"Dr. Bowes does not have a set timeline on his decision," the statement said. "The Nova Scotia Health Authority quality review and response need to be determined before a decision is made."

'I wish that more people had been there for him and he didn't feel alone like he did.'
- Dr. Paul Smith


When asked about the process that happens if police believe that a person with firearms could be a danger, Staff Sgt. James Bates, spokesman for New Brunswick RCMP, said he could not discuss anything related to a specific case.

"There are obviously provisions in the Criminal Code that as police officers, we would use to deal with a particular case, given the circumstances," he said.

When it comes to someone's access to firearms or ability to possess them, public safety has provincial jurisdiction and the national firearms program has federal jurisdiction, Bates said.

"Depending on the imminent nature of the situation, we would deal with it," he said.

The final decision, however, on whether somebody is fit to continue having a licence is a collaborative one between RCMP, public safety and the Canadian Firearms Program.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/murder-suicide-post-traumatic-stress-military-veteran-1.4162624

















































Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

What happened to Lionel Desmond? An Afghanistan veteran whose war wouldn’t end

Post by Guest on Sat 17 Jun 2017, 05:24

What happened to Lionel Desmond? An Afghanistan veteran whose war wouldn’t end


No one knows for sure why, 10 years after serving in Afghanistan, Lionel Desmond took a gun to his wife, his daughter, his mother and then himself. But an investigation by Lindsay Jones sheds new light on the pressing need to better understand soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder – and to find ways to support them before it’s too late


LINDSAY JONES
UPPER BIG TRACADIE, N.S.
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: SATURDAY, JUN. 17, 2017 12:40AM EDT


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/what-happened-to-lionel-desmond/article35328037/






Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

The struggle of 'Lionel Demon'

Post by Guest on Sat 17 Jun 2017, 15:17

Murder-suicide: The struggle of 'Lionel Demon'



By The Canadian Press Saturday, June 17, 2017


Lionel Desmond (front row, far right) was part of the 2nd battalion, of the Royal Canadian Regiment, based at CFB Gagetown and shown in this 2007 handout photo taken in Panjwai district in between patrol base Wilson and Masum Ghar in Afghanistan. Nova Scotia's medical examiner has ruled out conducting a fatality inquiry into a horrific murder suicide involving a former Canadian soldier who killed his wife, mother and young daughter before killing himself in the family's rural home earlier this year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Facebook-Trev Bungay

HALIFAX — As Nova Scotia’s health system continues to grapple with the disturbing case of Lionel Desmond, two of his sisters have come forward to shed new light on what happened to the former Canadian soldier, who was transformed from a fun-loving family man to a paranoid killer after serving two tours in Afghanistan.

“His shell came back, but that beautiful soul inside of him became a dark cloud,” Cassandra Desmond, one of his twin sisters, said in one of her first in-depth interviews this week.

It’s been almost six months since the murder-suicide in Upper Big Tracadie, in which Desmond killed his wife, mother and daughter.

Even though the killings fuelled a national debate about how Canada treats former soldiers, sailors and airmen living with PTSD, the RCMP and government officials have said little about a case that has raised questions about what happened to Desmond, and how such a tragedy can be prevented from happening again.

On Friday, a senior Nova Scotia health bureaucrat publicly apologized to the Desmond family for miscommunication that led to a delay in setting up a meeting to discuss an internal review of the man’s interaction with the health-care system.

“I did (apologize) in the sense of the frustration that they are experiencing in being able to come together with us,” said Colin Stevenson, the Nova Scotia Health Authority’s vice-president of quality. “It was miscommunication on my part.”

Earlier in the week, Cassandra and her twin sister Chantel demanded a judicial fatality inquiry, and they spoke at length about their brother and his struggles with his mental illness.

Diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and post-concussion disorder after his deployment in 2007, Desmond was 33 when he fatally shot his 52-year-old mother Brenda, his 31-year-old wife Shanna, and their 10-year-daughter Aaliyah in January. He then took his own life in the family’s rural Nova Scotia home.

Before he was deployed to Afghanistan, Desmond was a healthy, animated man with an infectious sense of humour and an endless capacity for hard work, Chantel Desmond told The Canadian Press.

“He was one of the happiest guys,” she said during an interview at her sister’s home in Antigonish, N.S. “You could be down in the dumps and he would lift you up. He was awesome.”

Cassandra Desmond was more emphatic, saying Lionel was the “clown of the family” and a definite ladies man.

“He was always imitating somebody or something,” she said, adding that his broad smile matched that of their mother Brenda. “There was never a dull moment around him ... I think of Lionel and I laugh and I smile.”

As a young man, Lionel Desmond met Shanna Borden when the two were attending high school, not far from where they would later live in Big Tracadie.

“He loved her,” said Chantel Desmond. “They were good.”

He enlisted in the military soon after graduating from high school and would later be promoted to corporal as a member of 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, based at Canadian Forces Base Gagetown in New Brunswick.

Lionel and Shanna Desmond’s daughter, Aaliyah, was born shortly before he left for Afghanistan in 2007.

A well-circulated photo from that time shows Shanna Desmond holding their infant daughter close to her smiling face as her husband snuggles in close, his right cheek touching Aaliyah’s forehead.

“Aaliyah, she was his life,” said Cassandra Desmond. “My mother, that was his best friend.”

However, Lionel Desmond was a radically changed man when he returned home from Afghanistan, and not much had changed by the time he was medically discharged in 2015, his sisters said.

They talked about how his sense of humour had dimmed and, more importantly, how he seemed withdrawn and in a defensive posture much of the time.

“He was still in combat mode,” Chantel Desmond said. “At dances, he would be spinning on the floor and thinking he was still in combat. Anything could set him off. He would wake up in cold sweats ... He would back into corners, have his back against the wall.”

And then there was his sense of guilt. In his personal journal, he wrote that the people he was fighting in Afghanistan “were people, too.”

Trev Bungay, a retired soldier who served in Afghanistan with Desmond, has said Desmond was a great soldier who did his job well, but he said it was a stressful deployment marked by heavy combat, many casualties and decidedly grim duties, including the body-bagging of dead Afghans and Taliban fighters.

The carnage on the battlefield left its mark on Lionel Desmond.

Cassandra said his wife, Shanna, could calm him down when certain sounds and smells would trigger a PTSD flashback. Even the rustling of the leaves in a breeze could set him off, even though he spent a lot of time in the woods.

“When my brother came back, they did nothing for him,” Chantel said, referring to the military and Veterans Affairs Canada. “He had to wait for his pension. He had to wait for everything. They was so much stress on him.”

Despite his struggles, Lionel Desmond and his wife worked hard to get help. He spent three months receiving some sort of treatment at a facility in Montreal. He was supposed to be there six months. The couple had appointments with many doctors. There was marriage counselling. And Lionel had a prescription for medical marijuana.

Some days, he seemed like his old self. There were many other days when he would mumble to himself and withdraw.

But it was clear that he was well aware of what he was dealing with.

“My brother was no stranger to his sickness,” Chantel said, noting that his Facebook page includes many entries in which he talks about wanting to be well again.

“I’m truly sorry for freaking out at my wife (and) daughter and people who know me,” one entry says. “I’m not getting a lawyer. I’m getting my life back.”

That was on Dec. 3, a month before the shootings.

“I apologize for anything out (of) my control,” he wrote. “I will fix it, if not I’ll live with it.”

At one point during his deployment, he hit his head on an light armoured vehicle after falling off a wall, and was later told he had post-concussion disorder as well as PTSD.

“That (explains) my jealousy towards my wife and being over-controlling and (my) vulgar tongue towards my family,” he wrote on his Facebook page, in which he called himself Lionel Demon.

His twin sisters said this week they were keen to get the recommendations from the Nova Scotia Health Authority’s quality review, but they made it clear they have grown frustrated by delays and what they perceive as a lack of disclosure and accountability.

Stevenson, spokesman for the authority on the Desmond file, confirmed Friday that the review was completed in March. However, he said he has been unable set up a meeting with relatives because of confusion over who would be represented.

Meanwhile, the province’s medical examiner, Matthew Bowes, has said he is also waiting to see the results of the quality review, which Stevenson said will not be released to the public, even though the authority has the option of doing so if all personal health information is deleted.

Stevenson said the authority wants to ensure those taking part in such reviews have the “confidence that they can come forward ... without the fear of the information they shared as being made public.”

“Anybody can ask, but we’re not actually obligated to release,” he said.

Stevenson also noted that the results of the review include only recommendations with no accompanying report.

http://www.thesudburystar.com/2017/06/17/murder-suicide-the-struggle-of-lionel-demon






Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

NDP demands inquiry into Afghanistan war veteran’s triple murder-suicide

Post by Guest on Mon 19 Jun 2017, 05:24

NDP demands inquiry into Afghanistan war veteran’s triple murder-suicide

LINDSAY JONES AND RENATA D’ALIESIO
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jun. 18, 2017 9:15PM EDT
Last updated Sunday, Jun. 18, 2017 9:15PM EDT


Calls are growing for an inquiry into a triple murder-suicide involving a mentally ill Afghanistan war veteran as serious questions persist about the medical care and support he received before and after his military release.

NDP Veterans Affairs critic Irene Mathyssen said the Canadian Forces have an obligation to examine how they handled Lionel Desmond, who in January shot and killed his wife, Shanna, 10-year-old daughter, Aaliyah, and his mother, Brenda, before turning the gun on himself in their Nova Scotia home. Mr. Desmond was released from the Forces just 18 months earlier.

“He wasn’t just one of those 70 poor souls who went somewhere quietly to end the pain,” Ms. Mathyssen said. This is “about a horrific act that took a mother, a child, a spouse, and we risk that [happening] again and again, if we don’t pay attention, if we don’t have the soul-searching and difficult inquiries that this begs.”

To date, no inquiries have been called.

The Forces maintain they don’t have the authority to investigate what happened because Mr. Desmond was no longer in the military, while the Nova Scotia Premier’s Office wouldn’t comment Sunday on the prospect of leading a probe.

Mr. Desmond, 33, is one of more than 70 Canadian soldiers and veterans who have killed themselves – and in rare cases, others – after serving in the Afghanistan war. A Globe and Mail investigation published on Friday revealed that the retired corporal, who had been an infantry soldier with the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment in Gagetown, N.B., was struggling at home and at work after his return from Afghanistan in August, 2007. Yet, he wasn’t assessed for post-traumatic stress until 2011.

Diagnosed with PTSD and major depression, Mr. Desmond was prescribed several drugs and advised to attend psychotherapy, but his mental state deteriorated, according to a psychiatric assessment obtained by The Globe. He was hyper-vigilant, quick to anger, had dissociative experiences and frequently thought about suicide, his psychiatrist noted.

His mental health worsened after he was released from the Forces on July 16, 2015. With no job prospects, suicidal thoughts lingered. Yet, Mr. Desmond was able to obtain a firearm licence from New Brunswick’s Department of Public Safety, The Globe investigation revealed.

Not long afterward, the family moved to the rural Nova Scotia community of Upper Big Tracadie, where both Mr. Desmond and his wife, Shanna, grew up. Relatives said the young vet was struggling to access the medical care he needed through the provincial health system.

Former veterans’ ombudsman Pat Stogran said the life and death of Mr. Desmond highlight long-standing problems with how the military deals with soldiers who are injured on the job. Many of them are medically discharged, even though they want to keep working.

“They’re kicking them out. They’re deeming them unfit for service,” said Mr. Stogran, who supports calls for an inquiry. “This is a huge problem that has to be splayed open for the Canadian people.”

Military boards of inquiry are routinely called when serving members take their own lives. The inquiries are designed to uncover what factors contributed to the death and offer recommendations to help prevent further suicides.

The Forces maintained they have no legal mandate under the National Defence Act to investigate the death of a veteran, but the language in Section 45 of the Act appears to offer Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan some latitude. The minister may convene a board of inquiry into “any matter connected with the government, discipline, administration or functions of the Canadian Forces.”

Military spokeswoman Jessica Lamirande said work is under way to improve the support and programs offered to soldiers slated for release. A new model is expected next year.

“Regardless of what led to Mr. Desmond’s actions or whether or not there is an official inquiry, we know that we need to do more,” Ms. Lamirande said. “We need to keep working towards implementing changes to our transition services and improve our delivery to those transitioning to civilian life.”

Retired Nova Scotia MP Peter Stoffer, a former NDP Veterans Affairs critic, is urging Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil to step up.

“There’s nothing stopping the Premier of Nova Scotia from taking a leadership role and saying to his federal counterparts, ‘Let’s work together, let’s develop an inquiry that involves all three levels and then let’s get to the bottom of this.’ Most importantly, open it up, so that the general public has an idea of what’s going on.”

The Premier’s Office wouldn’t comment on the prospect of leading an inquiry into the Desmond family tragedy. A spokesperson noted that the Nova Scotia Health Authority has completed a review of Mr. Desmond’s interaction with the health system and officials will meet with the family to discuss the findings and recommendations. Nova Scotia medical examiner Matthew Bowes has the authority to order a provincial fatality inquiry, but has yet to decide whether one will be convened in this case.

Conservative MP John Brassard, the party’s Veterans Affairs critic, said the Forces and Veterans Affairs have received a slew of recommendations over the years for improving how they deal with mentally ill members.

“We’re very good at building up our soldiers to prepare for combat, but we need to do a better job when they come back,” said Mr. Brassard, who, along with Ms. Mathyssen, is part of the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs. The committee has recently focused its work on mental health and suicide prevention and its report is expected to be tabled in Parliament on Monday.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ndp-demands-inquiry-into-veterans-triple-murder-suicide/article35355407/




Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

‘How can we hope for change?’: Nova Scotia avoiding inquests on high-profile deaths

Post by Guest on Wed 21 Jun 2017, 16:40

‘How can we hope for change?’: Nova Scotia avoiding inquests on high-profile deaths

In Nova Scotia, the last judicial inquiry was held in 2008 in the case of Howard Hyde, a musician with mental illnesses who died after an altercation with jail guards.


By MICHAEL TUTTONThe Canadian Press
Wed., June 21, 2017


HALIFAX—Lionel Desmond suffered rages from post-traumatic stress. He told relatives he struggled to access mental health services. Then he killed his family and himself.

Six months later, no public inquest aimed at preventing similar deaths is on the horizon — frustrating Desmond family members and repeating a familiar pattern for other Nova Scotians who’ve sought fatality inquiries.

Debbie Stultz-Giffin has followed the Desmond case since January, when the former soldier killed his wife, mother, daughter and himself in Upper Big Tracadie.

She sees links with her own fruitless calls for a public inquiry into the death of her 87-year-old mother, Dorothy Stultz. She died after a violent shove by a male resident with dementia in a nursing home on March 1, 2012.

“Again we are looking at other vulnerable individuals in a situation where if an investigation doesn’t happen, how can we hope for change?” she says of the Desmond case.

The Stultz death wasn’t made public until The Canadian Press discovered it last year among nine deaths classified as “homicides” by the medical examiner over the past decade — none of which have led to a fatality inquiry.


Meanwhile, since 2010 the province has had six non-natural deaths in its jails in cases that would trigger mandatory public inquests in most other Canadian jurisdictions.

Alberta held 24 public fatality inquiries last year, including one into the hanging death of Corp. Shaun Collins, an infantry soldier diagnosed with PTSD who had done two tours of Afghanistan.

Dr. John Butt, the former medical examiner for both Nova Scotia and Alberta, said in an interview that “without question” Nova Scotia should use its existing law to order a judicial inquiry into the Desmond case.

He also said the province should bring in reforms similar to Alberta’s, where a doctor, a lawyer and a layperson on a board would provide a recommendation for a discretionary cases like the Desmond murder-suicide.

He also called for Nova Scotia to create mandatory inquests for non-natural deaths in prisons.

“I can’t believe a province doesn’t have mandatory inquests under certain circumstances,” he said.

In the latest prison death, 42-year-old Jason LeBlanc died in a Cape Breton jail cell in January last year from an opiate overdose shortly after being arrested for an alleged parole violation.

Police reports said he told a prison nurse he’d taken five “nerve pill(s)” and appeared intoxicated, which has raised questions about why he wasn’t sent to a health facility for monitoring.

His father, Ernie LeBlanc, made repeated calls for a public inquest. Instead, he received a shortened version of an internal report by the Justice Department admitting corrections staff hadn’t followed procedures.

In Ontario’s system, inquests into such non-natural deaths of wards of the state are mandatory, and last year the province held 43 inquests into a variety of different types of deaths.

In Manitoba, six public inquests were held by judges, while British Columbia held seven.

In Nova Scotia, the last judicial inquiry was held in 2008 in the case of Howard Hyde, a musician with mental illnesses who died after an altercation with jail guards and a series of taserings in police custody.

There’s been nothing similar since.

Even in provinces that routinely hold inquests, cases like that of Lionel Desmond’s require a discretionary decision by the coroner or a review board, based partly on whether it could help prevent similar deaths.

But the prevention of future tragedies is precisely why Desmond’s twin sisters have confirmed they support an inquiry overseen by a judge that looks at health care for troubled veterans.

They told The Canadian Press their brother said he sought help in vain at St. Martha’s hospital in Antigonish before the murder-suicide.

“His exact words were, ‘They didn’t have my records.’ . . . That’s my understanding,” said Chantel Desmond. “He didn’t want to leave.”

That was on Jan. 2, the day before Desmond killed himself, 31-year-old Shanna, their 10-year-old daughter and his mother Brenda Desmond, 52.

A senior medical official in Nova Scotia has challenged the statement that Desmond, who had done two tours of Afghanistan, was turned away from hospital care.

Archie Kaiser, a Dalhousie University law professor with expertise on mental health issues, says the Desmond case is a clear example of where the medical examiner or the province’s justice minister should use their power to call an inquiry.

He argues the case fulfils provisions in the Fatalities Investigations Act that allowing for an inquiry when “in the public interest or the interest of public safety,” as it would provide insight into the treatment of veterans and into the issue of domestic violence.

“The complex relationships between employment-related PTSD for soldiers . . . the difficulties associated with reintegration into society and the availability of supportive services appear to be implicated,” he said.

Dr. Matthew Bowes, the province’s chief medical examiner, said he’s reluctant to call public inquiries if there are other means to examine the issues — even if they’re behind closed doors.

He says he wants to wait and see the results of a Nova Scotia Health Authority’s quality review — which are internal studies done by medical staff for educational purposes.

These reviews provide no open testimony, do not result in a written report on the facts of the case, and the health authority itself determines, in consultation with the families, who gets a copy of its action plan and recommendations.

Such studies also have been unsatisfactory to some families who’ve initially called for public inquests.

“Private investigations . . . opens up the gate for things to be overlooked, swept under the carpet and dismissed. It’s just not a healthy situation for everyone involved,” said Stultz-Giffin.

She received a brief report in her mother’s death — after an outburst of publicity about the case — from Health Department investigators that she said “left me feeling flat. There weren’t any real answers.”

Still, Bowes says that when he came to the province 14 years ago, senior bureaucrats told him “that judicial reviews as part of public policy renewal really ought to be more of a decision on the part of the minister.”

Nova Scotia’s new justice minister, Mark Furey, who has the power to call for a fatality inquiry, has declined requests for an interview on the topic of an inquest.

Meanwhile, Stultz-Giffin will be wishing the Desmond family well in their quest for an open inquiry even as her own hopes for such a process have long faded.

“It’s a societal issue and as a society we need to discuss these very types of issues,” she said.

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/06/21/how-can-we-hope-for-change-nova-scotia-avoiding-inquests-on-high-profile-deaths.html





Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Page 3 of 4 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum