4 Therapists Quit Edmonton OSI Clinic

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Judge Jury and Executioner Who says Policy saves lives Ask these Guys

Post by RobbieRoyal on Thu 05 Dec 2013, 17:02

4 Therapists Quit Edmonton OSI Clinic
Dec.5th.2013.
Mr. Peter Stoffer M.P.P.

Dear Sir;

It is with heavy heart and dismay that I write this letter. How many more soldiers have to die at the hands of the current Government before those responsible for the deaths of the four young men who found life to painful to cope because of their PTSD?

I was referred to the Edmonton OSI clinic. In Aug of 2013 for assessment and treatment for my diagnosed PTSD. Everything was going well with my weekly sessions until early Nov. 2013 when at the beginning of the session I was advised that my therapist and three others including the Manager had Quit their jobs in protest of the treatment and restrictions put on them while working with Veterans.

At no time in the history of OSI have four therapists in one location Quit their jobs because of the poor treatment of Veterans and the therapist trying to help them. It is unheard of four therapists quitting their job in protest of the Veterans Treatment.

As you may recall this time last year one soldier attempted to lite a member of VRAB on fire in Edmonton at the local Veteran Affairs Office. VAC was warned that more and more soldiers would end up hurting themselves and others and yet nothing was done to help them.

I was asked not to writ or reveal what happened at the Edmonton OSI but I can no hold it in anymore.

I trust that the God of the soldiers who took their own lives will take care of their souls and family and perhaps at the next election all Veterans will vote to remove the Government who says over and over we have put five billion in to treating soldiers which is just not true.

I am writing this with my name because I an no longer keep it a secret as requested.

This is what I have said since 2003 long before the NVC and it saddens me greatly
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RobbieRoyal
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Offering assistance for veterans who struggle with PTS

Post by r.murphy on Sat 11 Jan 2014, 16:01

My name is Richard Murphy. I have studied the teachings of Tai Chi for 32 yrs. This has given me insight into how people struggle to live in some degree of balance while trying to relate to others. I retired from the railroad due to work related injuries in 1990. Since then, I have helped people to deal with stress. I studied 'Tradititional Native Healing Methods' in a 2 yr. Diploma program through St. Clair college, Windsor and Chatham, ON. This course was offered to address the needs of first nations communities who had struggled for decades. Their history of abandonment issues, abuse, and growing up in alcoholic violence had a debilitating effect on whole communities. After graduating, I landed a job at a new healing facility called, Southwest Regional Healing lodge located at Muncey, On on the Muncey Delaware reserve. I worked there from 2000 to 2006. I am not Native and the reason they hired me was my Tai Chi experience. Due to the unique circumstances of Native people, having very few qualified Native counselors available, we were trained to assist them through a blend of traditional healing methods, cognitive behavioral therapy, and the teachings of Tai Chi. We enjoyed a great deal of success. Many of those who were feeling suicidal found new reasons to live. While we were helping families to heal from residential school abuses, we also offered a 2 yr. college program for Native men called, 'Tending The Fire' which was a Native mens leadership program. We recognized that men were responsible for most of the violence in Native communities. Therefore, we saw the opportunity to have a more exponential effect on communities by training men to overcome the effects of their traumatic experiences, and then go back to their communities and help the young men there. We found that many of these men had lost their sense of identity. They struggled with seeing themselves as protectors and providers. If they had been abused, then the dynamics were deeper. We found that awareness was vital to these people to help them to understand just what had happened to them and why. Once they understood the circumstances of their life, they were very willing to move forward through a healing program.  We used genograms to help them see how their families had been so affected by the past and how this had an influence on them today. We examined the trends of trauma and subsequent behaviors had shaped their potential. Then we examined the individual's lifeline to see how each stage of their life had led to where they were now. We helped them to recognize the cause and effect of their experiences and come to conclusions of what it meant for their future. Through application of the circle format, emotional release, and inner child work we helped them to change their perspective on who they were. They discovered that what had occured in their lives was mostly not their fault. We found that misdirected blame was a huge obstacle for these folks. They had lost hope for a better future. They were haunted by nightmares of their abuse. They felt helpless to find a better way to live. We addressed the misdirected blame, reestablished the positive relationship within, and provided them with a renewed sense of purpose. For the first time in their lives, they had meaning to refer to as they moved forward. They were able to reconcile the issues of abandonment, abuse and alcoholism that had previously defined them. We also dealt with those who had abused others and the deep abiding shame that they carried. When they found acceptance by others in the circle, they were profoundly affected in a good way. I have witnessed incredible human potential in the healing of first nations people. I believe that the effects of emotional trauma are similar for others. I have had the privilege to sit with Native individuals who had served in Vietnam as they were near the end of life due to agent orange exposure. My qualifications are in part due to what I experienced as part of my own training. I also went through this healing program as a client. I wanted to heal my own past of being abandoned by my father at birth. I needed to heal from abuse as a child. I also needed to reconcile the experience of growing up in an alcoholic and violent home. I have been married for 40 yrs. and that is only because I healed my own life. I did not want to be taken down by vicarious trauma as I helped others. While at the healing lodge, I focused my attention on helping caregivers to avoid vicarious trauma. Burnout is rampant among Native counselors. I know that I can help anyone who struggles with life. I know how deeply abandonment affects the soul. Abuse and alcoholism are also forms of abandonment in many circumstances. when people are given the opportunity to feel safe in a healing circle, they tend to flow through this process seamlessly. when they find that they are not the only ones who feel as they do, they feel reassured that there is a tangible sense of hope for them. It has been my experience that so many have expressed how relatively simple it was to heal, when a facilitator understands what they need. The circle is an amazing way to move a group forward. Tai Chi is all about relationships. Native teachings are also all about relationships. To heal the relationship within is primary. Everything else tends to flow from there.
I would feel honored to provide training for military personnel who could then facilitate this type of healing program for veterans. I would like the opportunity to serve in this way. I understand that soldiers will do better with their peers as helpers. They have expressed the need to have someone who has been there and therefore understands. This dynamic was also the need of first nations people. However, they were very accepting of my help, even though I am not Native. I know that I have what it takes to reach beyond the barriers and have a positive effect on a group of soldiers. I can offer them a comprehensive program which will help them to feel, think, and do better. This can become a positive cascade just as negativity sets up its own chain reaction of cause and effect. I do not fear the expression of emotions as part of the healing process. I welcome what needs to be expressed.  I have a very compassionate nature. I have developed the ability to understand the meaning of of someones experiences and to help them see it for themselves. My job is really the easy part. I describe myself as simply a tour guide. I would also like to offer similar healing to the spouses and families of soldiers. So, in closing, please consider how I may be of assistance. Whether it be to train facilitators, or to help a group of soldiers to feel whole once again, or to help their families to resolve their emotional issues. I am hoping to contribute to the wellness of our military personnel who have so gallantly served all of us. I hope this has answered some questions for you. Thank you, Richard Murphy. you can check out what I am all about in the book I recently published called, 'Change your Stress, Restore your Freedom to Choose'  
I can be contacted at - 519 798 1114. Thank you. Richard Murphy

r.murphy
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Number of posts : 3
Age : 65
Location : Stoney Point, ON
Registration date : 2014-01-11

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Re: 4 Therapists Quit Edmonton OSI Clinic

Post by Trooper on Sat 11 Jan 2014, 17:56

Glad to see that you are offering your assistance Mr. Murphy. The more people like yourself come forward with a contact number, like you have, the greater the chance of being able to reach out to those who are in need of such support.
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4 Therapists Quit Edmonton OSI Clinic

Post by Ex Member on Sun 12 Jan 2014, 12:38

Mr. Murphy I echo  trooper's sentiments ~ thank you for offering your support of Veterans and their families with your unique gift and therapy ~ a very selfless gesture and act of good will.  I hope this will be a catalyst for change in the lives of suffering soldiers. I would recommend contacting Veterans organizations in conjunction with Csat ~

On Facebook ~  Veterans Groups and Advocates

Al Cameron Veteran Voices of Canada
Mike Blais Rcr Cfds
Kevin Berry Veteran Advocate
Jim Lowther VETS Canada
Canadian Vets Advocacy
Military Minds
VETS Canada

As well an advocate for Veterans
Peter Stoffer, MP
Telephone: 902-861-2311
peter.stoffer.c1 @ parl.gc.ca

Jim Kargiayianis, MP
Telephone: (416) 321 5454
jim @ karygiannismp.com

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