WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

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WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by Nemo on Wed 19 Feb 2014, 12:23

There is an article on British soldiers who suffered from PTSD in WW1.  This page also includes a British Pathe video of soldiers who were helped by hynosis.  Makes one wonder if the Major who was treating these men like he did could help soldiers today if he were still alive.  I think what was accomplished here should be seriously looked at and studied to see if it could not be modified and structured to help vets today suffering from PTSD.  Cause when you look at the video's of the men before and after treatment - there is a huge difference.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2229655/Disturbing-Pathe-footage-World-War-One-reveals-devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital.html
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PTSD and Dental Problems

Post by Dove96 on Tue 25 Feb 2014, 21:03

I am posting this on Therapy Corner and Veteran’s Help.

I was talking to my dentist today.
He just got back from a conference in Chicago, one of the the main topics was clenching/bruxism and TMJ as a symptom of PTSD.
The studies were done with American Military and the findings were that almost 100% of PTSD sufferers had some form of these symptoms.

If you have PTSD please see your dentist and ask about the possibility you could have oral damage that could be related to bruxism/clenching.

Cracked or broken teeth, oral pain and your jaw moving out of alignment are all the results of these symptoms.

If you do put in a claim make sure you cover all bases.
IMPORTANT: Put in separate claims for each diagnosis: Bruxism, Teeth conditions and for TMJ. If there is damage to any teeth the teeth must be identified.

In my case I put in a claim for TMJ. The VA changed it to Bruxism and granted it.
I was happy because it gave me dental.
The first time I put in a claim one of the teeth that were cracked from bruxing broke and needed work. I found out bruxism only covers a night guard.
I had to get my dentist to examine all my teeth rate each one from the day he examined it and submit a claim from that day forward.
All damage done prior is not admissible or claimable. All the fine cracks and broken teeth are not considered "consequential" because it was not reported before this.

This problem is not limited to PTSD. People suffering from Chronic Pain also suffer from these symptoms and have the same results.

Don't put it off! See your dentist, make sure you are OK. If not start the claim procedure.
You never know when the teeth are going to finally crack or the jaw is going to need re-alignment.
$6000 worth of braces to realign my jaw
$2500 for one of my root canals (then finally having the cracked tooth pulled).
$??? for the upcoming post and crown when the braces are done.
Our Service dental plan (if you have it covers) a maximum of $1500 per year. The coverage for crowns, braces and most of the other work required to fix the cracked teeth is only 50% and you have to move the moon to get them to pay it.
Four years of fighting and counting. The ombudsman said it is a policy change level so they cannot help.


Last edited by Dove96 on Tue 25 Feb 2014, 21:17; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Adding more information)

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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by Anneteak on Wed 26 Feb 2014, 11:19

Wow! I wish I'd have known this years ago.  My husband lost all his upper teeth because they eroded from the back to the front from continual vomiting due to his pensionable condition and the meds he had to take for it.  He got dental work done and VA paid for part of it but it cost us $3500 up front and about $700 every two years since.

His dentists (we got more than one opinion) told us that it was no use trying to get him dental plates because a) his continual vomiting would probably result in him breaking them or losing them in the toilet, and b) he gets large painful cankers on his gums so he probably wouldn't wear them because they'd be too uncomfortable.  They recommended he get dental implants.  After several weeks/months of a back-and-forth dialogue between VA and his dental specialist, VA authorized two (2) implants.  The initial dental request was for eight ( 8 ).  The dentist explained to me that he didn't feel comfortable putting an upper plate (snaps into implant) in with only two implanted teeth anchoring it.  He said there was dental literature that indicated this was ok for a lower plate and two implants but that the upper would always be subject to gravity and also there was a possibility that one of the implants would 'fail?' and then he couldn't put his teeth in.  He also told me that after several conversations on the phone with the VA staff member, he was told that VA didn't have to authorize any implants, only plates or what we know as 'false teeth', but that "he was feeling good that day" so he would authorize two! When I hit the roof when I heard that statement, the dentist said that he had to work with VA all the time and would 'forget' he ever heard that statement if he were asked about it.  

Since we were concerned about going ahead with only two implants, we paid for the second pair at $3500.  In addition, whenever adjustments or repairs have to be made for the second two implants, we have to pay for them ourselves as VA never authorized them!

In addition, we've come up with "maximum" amounts of dental work per year and have to pay for that too when his work exceeds the VA cap.  He's been in chronic pain since 1995 and also has PTSD.

I have never wasted effort in 'hating' anyone or anything, but VAC might change my mind! We were never advised by anyone at VA concerning his dental work even though I wrote the then MVA and complained about the situation. Of course, more platitudes and nothing of substance was the response.

Thanks for providing the information you did in your post!
Anneteak

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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by Dove96 on Wed 26 Feb 2014, 11:54

Thank you.

Have you considered getting the info together and putting in a claim for the continuing dental care? It sounds like you have a full history of the cause and effect.

Dental is a big issue with the VA. Dental TAC is very strict so you need information - the more the better. After 3 years of head butting I had an advocate assigned to me from the Ombudsman to help deal with some of the TAC issues. You can go that way if you need help.


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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by Anneteak on Wed 26 Feb 2014, 12:10

Thanks Dove

Hubby is in PTSD treatment at Bellewood in TO at the moment, but this is something he can do when he gets back.  I've totally had it with VAC (see my post re War of Attrition in the Therapy Corner) and refuse to deal with most of them. The only one I feel I can trust is his CM who is also a veteran, but he has a huge caseload so most inquiries are handled by the less competent among them.  Also, he will be contacting the Ombudsman as well.  

The really great news is that since he's started treatment, he seems like a new man :)and he'll be able to handle these things for himself with a little help.

Anneteak

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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by Anneteak on Fri 14 Mar 2014, 10:20

This is just a note to say thank you Robbie for starting this thread and for the rest of you for contributing to it.  I have read all of it and reread specific posts.  This thread has been a tremendous help to me since Eric went into treatment for his PTSD.  It's allowed me, in a very small way, to put myself in his boots and to better understand his demons.  I know you didn't write this for my benefit, but I'm so thankful you've put it out here were I and others who aren't dealing with this devastating illness on a first person basis can better understand in order to empathize with those we love.
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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by RobbieRoyal on Tue 08 Apr 2014, 18:35

your welcome and good luck Anneteak
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Medical Cannabis - Proven Treatment for PTSD, Chronic Pain and many other illnesses

Post by cfvet77 on Wed 09 Apr 2014, 19:15

I am new to the forum, but would like to inform as many Veterans of the proven positive effects that Medical Cannabis/Marijuana has on the treatment of PTSD, Chronic Pain and many other illnesses. The amount of ex-soldiers that were released from the CF from PTSD alone is a staggering number, and continues to grow on a daily basis. Over the past number of years, I have experienced a lot of pain and anxiety, and witnessed others do the same. Many ex-soldiers say that the meds that are pushed by doctors, do not work and or cause horrible side effects. These Veterans, myself included, swear by the use of cannabis alone to treat their service injury. I realize that Medical Cannabis is not the solution for everyone, and I am not trying to push the use of Marijuana on anyone...but rather just inform you that there is an alternative.
If you are not aware, as of April 1st, Canadian Marijuana Laws have changed drastically. Individuals with a medical diagnosis from a Doctor can simply obtain medical marijuana thru a Licensed Producer of their choice. I am currently a client of one of these providers ( Marijuana For Trauma Inc.) and am receiving medical cannabis on a monthly basis. By using medical cannabis, I no longer have to take the array of prescribed medications that I once did, and it also works great for my chronic back pain.
With a doctors prescription, DVA currently pays for up to 5 grams per day of medical marijuana.
Hope this article helps those that are in need of a natural alternative to the multitude of synthetic medication that is prescribed.

Below are a few scientific and medical resources to check out:

policymic.com/articles/84675/10-surprising-health-benefits-of-medical-marijuana
medicalmarijuana.com/medical-marijuana-treatments/Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder-PTSD
mftgroup.ca/links/
mftgroup.ca/resources/


Last edited by cfvet77 on Thu 10 Apr 2014, 21:26; edited 1 time in total

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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by Teentitan on Wed 09 Apr 2014, 21:41

Do you have any info on the Cannabis spray for pain? I have heard about it but have not read about it. Any info appreciated
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Cannabis Spray - Vaporizing Medical Marijuana

Post by cfvet77 on Thu 10 Apr 2014, 08:19

Teentitan, yes currently in Canada (since 2005) a cannabis spray has been available as a pharmaceutical; called Sativex.
I am not sure of the associated guidelines and or if DVA/Blue Cross covers this product, but it would be a good idea to have a chat with your doctor and DVA about this.
I have never used the spray, but apparently it is extremely effective in treating pain. If the spray is not covered by Blue Cross, consider vaporizing the dry marijuana product. The vapor provides a sweet taste and has barely any smell associated when using. Vaporizers are covered by DVA/Blue Cross; due to their use being one of the safest ways to consume medical cannabis.
Attached are links that might interest you, and FAQs (from mftgroup.ca) about how to obtain medical marijuana through a Health Canada provider:

cannabisculture.com/articles/4310.html

theweedblog.com/smoking-marijuana-vs-vaporizing-marijuana-infographic/

mftgroup.ca/faqs/

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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by birdgunner on Fri 02 May 2014, 12:46

As with other Vets, with similar medical conditions, I too was fed-up with the types and quanity of narcotics I was prescribed. Not to mention the brutal side effects.

I discussed Nabilone with the hospital pain management team and they agreed to prescribe the medication.

VAC at first would not cover the drug but after repeated requests I was finally approved.

You can read about Nabilone here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nabilone

It has decreased my pain levels slighlty but it is not the wonderdrug I believed it could be...it might work better for you.
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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by pinger on Fri 02 May 2014, 21:21

Hey birdie, tx for your take. I'm apprehensive... but that route might be less toxic on my liver than all the crap I'm on. I'll ask my doctor. pinger.

Rock the Hill.
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Re: WW1 reveals devastating-effects-shell-shock-soldiers-treated-pioneering-Devon-hospital

Post by RCN-Retired on Sat 03 May 2014, 01:12

Guys, I suffer from chronic back pain and have undergone many different procedures including having some of my nerve endings frozen. I have been on OxyContin for several years and always afraid of becoming addicted so suffered the pain much of the time. My Dr prescribed a new drug for me: TRIDURAL/TRAMADOL. I had to send a request to VAC to have it covered and I can honestly say in the month I have taken it my pain has been greatly reduced. My Dr explained that it is a non addicting drug and is slow released over a 24 hour period so it continues to work. If you have not heard of it and live in pain ask your Dr about it as it seems to have helped me and am off the OxyContin
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Consecutive condition to PTSD - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) - Question

Post by cosmo12 on Tue 20 May 2014, 12:35

Hi guys;

I have a claim for IBS consecutive to PTSD - Does anyone outthere got this consecutive to their PTSD condition ? - If yes what is the % and at what fifth are you ? In order for me to manage my expectation regarding this claim. This condition is in para C of the Enttilement guiline for PTSD.

quote:

The list of Section C conditions is not all inclusive. Conditions, other than those listed in Section C, may be claimed to have a consequential relationship to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and / or its treatment. Other conditions may be considered for entitlement based on the individual merits and medical evidence provided for each case. Consultation with Medical Advisory should be considered.

•Sexual Dysfunction (e.g., Erectile Dysfunction)
•Irritable Bowel Syndrome
•Bruxism
•Xerostomia
•Periodic Limb Movement Disorder
•Restless Leg Syndrome
•Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Thanks for your help
Cosmo

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Reservist with PTSD in trouble

Post by 0434me on Wed 28 May 2014, 20:37

Hi there everyone;

I ran into some trouble in 2003 on tour in Bosnia. I sat on it until fairly recently, when it came back to haunt me to the point that I couldn't parade anymore, and I'm even having a great deal of difficulty working, (I've been effectively under-employed since about December.)
I've gone through VAC to seek support, and engaged the CF Medical system, in order to get help moving forward. My experiences with both organizations has been mixed. I was recently told by the CF that I needed psychiatric and medical care, but due to the fact that I live in a remote location, the CF can't provide me with care, and I need to go through VAC to get the care I need. VAC says that they can take care of me, but throughout all of this is the overarching issue of income; I try to support a family of five. I can't afford to take the time to get treatment. I'm a Reservist, so the rules of income support are convoluted in my case. I need to take care of myself and go to the doctors to get help, but I can't afford to take the time off to do it.
This is a mess. Does anyone have any thoughts on my situation? I know that someone in my condition is prone to overreacting, but it's really hard for me to justify the situation I'm in as anything less than being tossed like a hot potato until I go away or Release under voluntary circumstances in disgust.

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