Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

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Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Guest on Wed 23 Nov 2016, 18:11

Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

'My life is being threatened by our government,' says Fredericton man who served in Afghanistan

Jordan Gill · CBC News


Noah Starr, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan, says the federal government shouldn't decide how much medical marijuana veterans need for their mental health.

A Fredericton veteran says the Trudeau government's decision to reduce the daily amount of medical marijuana it will cover for veterans could have serious consequences.

Noah Starr, who served Afghanistan, says the government's interference in the issue amounts to a threat to his health and well-being.

"I do not consume cannabis for fun," said Starr, who smokes marijuana for post-traumatic stress syndrome. "I consume cannabis because of the things, because of the horrifying things I've seen overseas."

The government announced Tuesday that starting next May, it will reimburse veterans for only three grams of marijuana a day, down from the 10 grams it covers now.

Starr said Wednesday that marijuana affects everyone differently, and you can't set a generic dose that would work with all patients. He said that decision should be made by patients and their doctors, not the government.

"For some department that is tasked with essentially ensuring veterans have better quality of life to now decide, on their own, that the amount of medicine I'm getting isn't correct, without doing any due diligence on me specificall y... medical cannabis works differently for everybody."

Some veterans need more

Although Starr doesn't use 10 grams a day, he knows veterans who do. In fact, he was originally prescribed a dose of 15 grams a day, he said.

"Frankly, I do not want to be on anything, but this is the means that I have found [to] my wellness, and I'm now being threatened," he said. "My life is being threatened by our government."

He worries there will be veterans who will need more than three grams a day just to cope and said he fears what will happen if they can't get it.

"I am terrified that my brothers and sisters in arms are going to end up dead," Starr said.


Minister of Veterans Affairs Kent Hehr announced the changes to the medical marijuana coverage for veterans Tuesday.

It's not just the amount of marijuana the government will cover that worries Starr, but the cost per gram. The government said it will only reimburse $8.50 a gram of marijuana starting next May.

Starr said effective strains of marijuana can cost as much as $15 a gram, and limiting the quality available to veterans may increase the amount they need to use.

"So now they're actually, effectively, playing with my quality of life, because now I have to consume more cannabis," he said. "They're playing with my health because now I have to put more drugs into my body."

PTSD

Starr was diagnosed with PTSD while serving in Afghanistan. He said he survived his tour of duty by using sleeping pills and engaging in talk therapy. When his tour finished, he was given traditional prescription drugs, which was not an ideal treatment.

"These pharmaceutical drugs that they had me on, what ended up happening is they just put me on another pill, more of that pill, then another pill, then another pill, then another pill, then a pill to treat the side-effects of the other pills I was taking," said Starr.

"It just turned into this cycle of pills and I was not getting any quality of life."


In addition to only covering three grams of medical marijuana, the government will only cover the drug at $8.50 a gram.

One problem Starr encountered was even when he felt he didn't need the drugs that day, he had to take them, or suffer the consequences.

"If I decided, 'look I don't want to take my drugs today, I feel good, I feel like I can cope,' I would get wicked withdrawal," said Starr.

"These drugs are so toxic that if I stopped taking them I would be in physical pain."

Drug changed his life

Starr said that once he started using medical marijuana, his life improved dramatically.

"I started to get quality of life back," he said. "I started to search inside myself to find wellness. I'm more active in the community. I've developed a business where essentially I'm giving back to the community."

Starr said he's unsure why the government would choose to cut theveterans' dosage it will cover, but he had strong words for Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr.

"He's going to have blood on his hands. ... This is irresponsible."

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/new-brunswick/fredericton-medical-marijuana-vet-1.3864020

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Yukoner decries new limits on medical marijuana for veterans

Post by Guest on Wed 23 Nov 2016, 18:19

Yukoner decries new limits on medical marijuana for veterans

Darcy Grossinger says Ottawa's plan to reduce the amount of pot it covers for veterans is unfair

CBC News
Nov 23, 2016


Whitehorse veteran Darcy Grossinger worries that his friends who use medical marijuana and need more than 3 grams per day will have trouble getting approval.

A veteran in Whitehorse is not impressed with the federal government's decision to cut back the amount of medical marijuana it will cover for people who have served in the military.

Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr plans to scale back the limit for reimbursement from 10 grams of medical marijuana per day to three.

Whitehorse vet Darcy Grossinger says he doesn't use pot himself, but has many friends who do. He thinks the decision to reduce the reimbursements is arbitrary and unfair.

"Everyone says, 'this is what works for me'. If they're saying it's working for them, then [federal officials] have got no right to do what they are doing."

"People have some kind of idea that this is a party. No — this is medicine, being used medicinally."

Number of prescriptions up

Last March, Minister Hehr told CBC News he was launching an internal policy review, after data showed the number of medical marijuana prescriptions had shot up.

Veterans will be allowed to continue charging for their current amount until May 21, 2017. There will also be an exception for veterans in "exceptional circumstances." A psychiatrist, pain specialist, oncologist or other health specialist would have to submit an application explaining the rationale for a larger quantity.

That doesn't satisfy Grossinger, who says vets don't always have ready access to medical specialists.

"I've been without a G.P. for two years now. I just got one. If I were to see a pain specialist — or put myself on a waiting list — I'm looking at years."

Hehr has said the changes were just the "starting point" and that it was his intention to revisit the changes in the policy to ensure they reflect the best research, practice and experience.

With files from Cheryl Kawaja and Catherine Cullen

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/north/medical-marijuana-limits-yukon-veterans-grossinger-1.3863268

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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Teentitan on Wed 23 Nov 2016, 22:23

I don't want to put a damper on this large cut to MM but DO NOT allow this topic to distract the conversation from bringing back the lifelong pension.

This is a PR created spin to distract the veteran community. Do not fall for it.
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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Dannypaj on Thu 24 Nov 2016, 05:28

teentitan wrote:I don't want to put a damper on this large cut to MM but DO NOT allow this topic to distract the conversation from bringing back the lifelong pension.

This is a PR created spin to distract the veteran community.  Do not fall for it.

Exactly my thought teen! DISTRACTION,  we should be using the airtime and take light jabs at the announcements and the misguided information being delivered across Canada as well.
5.7 billion dollars, but !
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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by tetech on Thu 24 Nov 2016, 08:50

Just to let everyone know, Organigram has lowered all their Cannabis to $8.50/gm.

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Aphria agrees with changes to Veteran Affairs policy

Post by Guest on Thu 24 Nov 2016, 11:56



November 24, 2016 08:44 ET

Aphria agrees with changes to Veteran Affairs policy

Aphria fully supports veteran community

LEAMINGTON, ON--(Marketwired - November 24, 2016) - Aphria Inc. ("Aphria" or the "Company") (TSX VENTURE: APH) (OTCQB: APHQF) agrees with the recent changes made by the Canadian federal government to its Veteran Affairs policy on medical cannabis. The change limits the daily amount prescribed to veterans to three grams unless they receive a special exemption.
"We always fulfill patients' orders based on the recommended dosage from their doctor, so we're pleased that the new regulations include provisions for veterans individual requirements and that coverage will be tailored accordingly," said Vic Neufeld, Chief Executive Officer. Aphria works in full transparency with Health Canada within strict regulatory guidelines and to the highest ethical standards when delivering health care options. The Company does not engage in the practice of dual pricing between veteran and non-veteran platforms. Aphria is committed to working with Health Canada and all regulators to ensure that all patients, regardless of medical coverage, continue to receive the best possible treatment options.
The CannWay brand is an example of how Aphria serves the veteran community. It was developed by veterans specifically for their peers and the product line is comprised of an assortment of strains that they hand selected to manage the various ailments they deal with daily, including PTSD and chronic pain. "We always have, and always will, work collaboratively with veterans to support them in getting the medicine they require and the patient care they need. We even have dedicated personnel in place to specifically work with this group," continued Neufeld.
The Company prides itself on its superior patient care and continues to receive impressive accolades from independent industry associations and sites, including winning the 2016 Canadian Cannabis Award for Best Customer Service. "We are so proud of our team and the meaningful impact they have on our patients lives every day" Neufeld concluded.
We have a Good Thing Growing.
About Aphria
Aphria Inc., one of Canada's lowest cost producers, produces, supplies and sells medical cannabis. Located in Leamington, Ontario, the greenhouse capital of Canada. Aphria is truly powered by sunlight, allowing for the most natural growing conditions available. We are committed to providing pharma-grade medical cannabis, superior patient care while balancing patient economics and returns to shareholders. We are the first public licenced producer to report positive cash flow from operations and the first to report positive earnings in consecutive quarters.
For more information, visit www.Aphria.com.

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS: Certain information in this news release constitutes forward-looking statements under applicable securities laws. Any statements that are contained in this news release that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Forward looking statements are often identified by terms such as "may", "should", "anticipate", "expect", "potential", "believe", "intend" or the negative of these terms and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements in this news release include, but are not limited to, statements with respect to internal expectations, estimated margins, expectations for future growing capacity and costs, the completion of any capital project or expansions, any commentary related to the legalization of marijuana and the timing related thereto, expectations of Health Canada approvals and expectations with respect to future production costs. Forward-looking statements necessarily involve known and unknown risks, including, without limitation, risks associated with general economic conditions; adverse industry events; marketing costs; loss of markets; future legislative and regulatory developments involving medical marijuana; inability to access sufficient capital from internal and external sources, and/or inability to access sufficient capital on favourable terms; the medical marijuana industry in Canada generally, income tax and regulatory matters; the ability of Aphria to implement its business strategies; competition; crop failure; currency and interest rate fluctuations and other risks.
Readers are cautioned that the foregoing list is not exhaustive. Readers are further cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements as there can be no assurance that the plans, intentions or expectations upon which they are placed will occur. Such information, although considered reasonable by management at the time of preparation, may prove to be incorrect and actual results may differ materially from those anticipated.
Forward-looking statements contained in this news release are expressly qualified by this cautionary statement.
Neither the TSX Venture Exchange (the "Exchange") nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/aphria-agrees-with-changes-to-veteran-affairs-policy-tsx-venture-aph-2178301.htm

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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by 6608 on Thu 24 Nov 2016, 12:12

Here's one from CBC..............New peters view on this subject but "full lifestyle examination"


Stigma of the lazy pot-smoker hurts medical marijuana users


For many users, the high they get is an unwanted side-effect
By Peter Thurley, for CBC News Posted: Nov 24, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Nov 24, 2016 5:23 AM ET


When people hear that someone uses cannabis, they often give a nudge nudge​ wink wink and say, "Lucky you, getting high on weed, eh?"

I usually chuckle and reply that the official scientific name of the plant is "cannabis," and that it is medicine. For me, it's used to dull chronic nerve pain left after an invasive surgery to repair burst bowels and remove a 25-pound desmoid tumour.

It can also be used as an appetite stimulant, it quickly kills nausea and it relaxes anyone who needs to deal with frightening flashbacks of their time in hospital.

Yet the image of the lazy pot-smoker remains one of the most prevailing stigmas about medical cannabis users, and it was on full display recently during a CBC News interview with former NDP MP Peter Stoffer about cannabis use among veterans.

Once the NDP's critic for veterans affairs, Stoffer, who is now the public spokesperson for Nova Scotia-based Trauma Healing Centers, quipped that the 10 grams a day of cannabis allowed under Veterans Affairs Canada rules is "an awful lot of marijuana to give one person."  Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr seems to agree, and announced this week that the limit will be scaled back to three grams.

In his interview, Stoffer added that veterans should be subject to a full lifestyle examination before being granted access to cannabis, suggesting that some might be using it simply to get high.


Novelty wears off

The novelty of being a cannabis consumer wears off quickly. For many medical cannabis users, the potential high is an unwanted side-effect.

So it was disappointing to read Stoffer repeat long-debunked myths about medical cannabis users looking for a buzz rather than relief in his thinly veiled comments about "lifestyle monitoring." That's simply not true.

And while the federal government does play a role in how veteran health care dollars are spent, it does not have the right to come between a patient and their doctor — nor should  Veterans Affairs Canada be asking questions about a patient's lifestyle, financial status or eating habits. If they don't do it for other prescription medications, why should they do it for cannabis?


As Canada moves towards full legalization, it will be incumbent on the burgeoning cannabis industry to take steps to explain the various ways of consuming cannabis. Extractions, for instance, take much more plant matter to produce than other methods such as smoking or vaporizing.

Indeed, according to Maxim Zavet, CEO at Emblem Cannabis, it may be that veterans are relying increasingly on oils instead of smoking the dried flower — something that requires more plant material and may not contain psychoactive ingredients like THC. Stoffer acknowledged that fact in a follow-up call I had with him, but he held fast to his position, saying, "Everyone knows that 10 grams is a lot."

Like me, Michael Blais, of Canadian Veterans Advocacy, respects Stoffer and applauds the work he did in the House of Commons. But he also agreed that these long-standing stigmas about medical cannabis must fall, especially for Canada's veterans, who have already given so much for the sake of our nation. "There aren't many of us who have sustained a battle injury," he reminded me.


In 2017, Canada will become the first G7 nation to fully legalize cannabis use, both medically and recreationally. It would be a shame if Stoffer's cannabis myths — relics left over from the failed war on drugs — were to further disadvantage our veterans, right when they need our help the most.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/medical-marijuana-stigma-1.3861027





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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Guest on Thu 24 Nov 2016, 12:34

This has nothing to do with the well being of Veterans, it has everything to do with cost!
At the beginning of Kent's position, he stated on the national news that money was of no concern when it comes to our file, when asked, how much are you willing to spend? He replied as much as it takes.
Like all politicians, he reneges on what he promises.

Like the creation of the NVC, this was all about cost savings, everything within the NVC is taxed, the government pays out benefits, and the government recoups from the payed taxes disabled Veterans pay from their NVC benefits.

You haven't seen anything yet, just wait until you see what they bring forward in terms of a lifelong pension.
This I'm certain will be the biggest disappointment of the Liberal's term.

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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Dannypaj on Thu 24 Nov 2016, 13:01

Shuffle Hehrrr Exclamation that is an Idea let's keep our file on the for front  Arrow we want all veterans feeling sunny not  Sad .
Agree


Last edited by Dannypaj on Fri 25 Nov 2016, 06:07; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Supremedebater on Thu 24 Nov 2016, 15:36

I would like to see the number with regards to costs of meds for a veteran then a comparison of that to medical marijuana. You don't see the goc cutting big pharma meds now do we? Hmmm I am thinking the goc really do not think medical marijuana is actually truthfully helping veterans. I believe the price was staggering by the providers and feel that the goc had to have a say. Well they have and it's been brought down to almost half the costs. I think they've proven they're point but legally can't say what they will pay for since they pay for another's pharmaceuticals prescribed. I also believe a legal challenge could be at hand here. We will see, curious to see how this will pan out for vets. I believe they're going to get more then 3 grams per day....This was just a knee jerk as stated. $8.50 is a lot better then $12 or $15.

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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Dannypaj on Fri 25 Nov 2016, 06:21

We demand a Veteran in the position of Minister of Veterans Affairs Canada (and  a Veteran who is in the VAC system)queen .  Progress and finalizing our case file (Equitas Lawsuit) would surly be expedited through.  
Unless the words are coming out of someone's mouth that has all best intentions and has served in the CAF and actual can back up statements with experience, we (me) may have troubles relating with a minister with no military experience.
Sincerely yours,
Danny J.
P.s the last person in that position was clueless or just didn't care
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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by czerv on Fri 25 Nov 2016, 13:13

It is amazing the speed they/VAC can implement some policy/cuts and they cannot fix the pension mess.  He (Herr) can work when he is told to do so.

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Medical Marijuana Could Help End Canada's Veteran Suicide Crisis

Post by Guest on Fri 25 Nov 2016, 17:41

Marc Davis
Medical Marijuana Could Help End Canada's Veteran Suicide Crisis
Posted: 11/25/2016 11:00 am EST Updated: 11/25/2016 11:07 am EST


Fabian Henry is a veteran living with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Former Canadian combat engineer Fabian Henry used to thrive on adrenaline -- especially in combat zones -- during his 12 years in the military.

Now he smokes medical marijuana to avoid stressors that remind him of his most disturbing wartime experiences. And that's what now keeps him sane, he says.

"Cannabis is saving veterans' lives, including my own. It's improved the quality of my life by making me feel normal again," he explains. "Before that, I drank heavily to numb my feelings, and at times was so depressed that I felt suicidal. Now I have my old self back."

During two tours of duty in Afghanistan, Henry's work included defusing hidden roadside mines, so he considers himself lucky to have made it home in one piece. But his mind didn't get off so lightly. In fact, the war still rages in his darkest thoughts, especially his memories of fallen comrades.



Far too many other ex-servicemen are also psychologically tormented by memories of the horrors they've experienced or witnessed, particularly while serving as peacekeepers in far-flung, strife-torn lands.

It's a condition that's clinically diagnosed as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Symptoms include anxiety, hyper-vigilance, nightmares, flashbacks, memory loss and insomnia, loss of libido, as well as emotional numbness and social isolation.

And this latent psychological danger can be deadly. In fact, there have been a disproportionately high number of suicides among war veterans in recent years.

Among Afghanistan war veterans alone, one ex-soldier has committed suicide for every three battlefield fatalities, statistics show -- a figure that now stands at 71.

And much of this is due to the high prevalence of PTSD among ex-servicemen.


Fabian Henry, pictured in civilian clothes, has found that medical marijuana helps control symptoms of PTSD that he experiences.

In light of such shocking figures, Canada's federal government must start financing enough scientific studies to definitively determine if pot can mitigate this high rate of suicides. So say some frustrated war veterans, including Henry, who founded a PTSD support group in 2014 called Marijuana for Trauma.

"From what I've seen and experienced, the anti-depressants and anti-psychotics veterans are given to treat PTSD simply don't work. They can actually make it worse, and can even trigger suicidal thoughts," he says.

"It's imperative that the government starts doing medical research here in Canada."

"Even the opioids prescribed to veterans for pain are highly addictive and can be deadly in big enough doses," he adds.

Side-effects of conventional pharmaceutical treatments commonly prescribed for PTSD can include impaired cognition (mental "fog"), erectile dysfunction, lethargy, weight gain and, in some cases, chemical dependency.

Henry adds, "It's imperative that the government starts doing medical research here in Canada. There needs to be scientific proof for what we already know from anecdotal evidence among veterans, which is that cannabis works in treating PTSD."



His veteran-run organization currently serves about 4,050 veterans with PTSD and has 12 clinics all across Canada. Its mandate is to wean them off debilitating pharmaceutical drugs, coupled with giving them cannabis education and helping them get access to government-subsidized medical marijuana.

This helps explain why an increasing number of veterans affected by PTSD are turning to medical marijuana as an alternative.

In fact, there's been a 15-fold increase in the number of veterans gaining legal access to medical marijuana via Veterans Affairs Canada over the past three years.

So far the figure is around 3,100, and still trending upwards.

The fact that Veterans Affairs Canada has been grudgingly paying for veterans' marijuana (up to 10 grams per day), while also discouraging them from using it, is very problematic, Henry continues.

Just a couple of days ago, the feds announced that veterans' daily allocated maximum limit of 10 grams will be reduced as of next May to only three grams. This rationing is mostly due to the escalating cost -- an estimated $75 million for 2016 -- of catering to an increasing number of veterans, according to Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr.

However, the government's stinginess may also be aligned with its official position on cannabis, Henry says. Its longstanding attitude has been that there's not enough science to prove that pot helps with PTSD.

This position was reasserted on Tuesday in a report from Canada's Auditor General Michael Ferguson, much to the distaste of Henry.

Henry insists that this unnecessary impasse is making many physicians reluctant to prescribe cannabis to veterans. And this can have fatal consequences for those who have suicidal thoughts but don't have legal access to cannabis.

"The dire need for this PTSD research is so obvious with our epidemic of veteran suicides."

Admittedly, the science supporting the benefits of cannabis for treating PTSD is scant.

Extraordinarily, there's only one federal-government-approved study underway in the U.S. And its lead investigator, Dr. Sue Sisley, is a vocal critic of her government's "unconscionable" foot-dragging in approving more financing for this kind of research.

"The dire need for this PTSD research is so obvious with our epidemic of veteran suicides," she says.

Finally, Canada recently initiated its own inaugural clinical trial to study the effects of medical cannabis on PTSD. It is being conducted by the University of British Columbia (UBC) and a B.C. medical cannabis grower, Tilray. It is expected to be completed in the spring of 2018.

"Cannabis does what pills can't do."

One of the study's lead researchers is Zach Walsh, an Associate Professor of Psychology at UBC. He explains, "We know that a lot of veterans are using cannabis to deal with their symptoms," he says.

"But the research hasn't been there for us to get a sense of how it works, who it works best for, and are there differences between different types of cannabis that make some types more effective than others?"

Henry is relieved that medical science may soon come to terms with what he says is becoming common knowledge among veterans: "Cannabis does what pills can't do; it's effective at treating the symptoms of PTSD."

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/marc-davis-/veterans-ptsd-medical-marijuana_b_13206762.html










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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by 1993firebird on Fri 25 Nov 2016, 19:26

Just smoke what you have and enjoy.

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Re: Fredericton veteran calls federal cut to medical marijuana coverage 'irresponsible'

Post by Rifleman on Sat 26 Nov 2016, 12:17

Agree firebird and then grow the rest

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