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assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

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Re: assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

Post by bigrex on Mon 18 Jun 2018, 09:50

The Contributing factor is used to decrease a claim, not increase it. That table was created, so that they can reduce a claim, if a completely separate claimed condition, presents the same symptoms, used for making the assessment. For example, if you are approved for one medical condition, and assessed at a certain level, because it interferes with sleep, so many times a night. But then, you submit a different claim, and one of the symptoms they use for reaching an assessment, also involves loss of sleep. So they would use the partially contributing table, to reduce the second claim, because it would be impossible to determine how much sleep was lost, due to each condition.
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Re: assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

Post by Artie Simm on Mon 18 Jun 2018, 01:06

Thanks, but still none of this explains the contributing factor chart to me.


Last edited by Artie Simm on Mon 18 Jun 2018, 12:11; edited 1 time in total
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Re: assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

Post by bigrex on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 12:47

Actually, I just had a look at the VAC table of disabilities for Psychiatric conditions. All psychiatric condition fall under the umbrella of mental illness, including substance abuse, so there isn't a separate chart for symptoms caused by PTSD , or depression. So they will look at your reported symptoms, and compare your loss of function for the four charts below, to see how much any mental illness has on your life, without being concerned with which condition is causing that loss of function.

1. Thought and Cognitive,
2. Emotion, Behaviour and Coping (Adaptability),
3. Activities of Daily living, and
4. Treatment Needs.

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Re: assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

Post by bigrex on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 12:19

PTSD is considered the most severe form of mental illness that VAC deals with, and any others will fall under it's Umbrella. Now if you had been diagnosed with mild depression, and had received a small DA for it, but it wasn't severe enough to end your career. But then went into Afghanistan, and then came home and were diagnosed with PTSD, you could argue that the two should be treated as separate claims. But as it is, since it is well documented that those suffering from PTSD first, will often suffer from anxiety and depression, they will never be treated as consequential claims. And alcoholism, and drug addiction, are not medical conditions in themselves, just indicators of other underlying conditions.
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Re: assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

Post by Artie Simm on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 07:18

bigrex wrote:I think the best way I can explain it, would be using a knee injury, or more specific, multiple knee injuries, as an example. First injury, a veteran tears their MCL in Afghanistan, and requires surgery. it would be granted full entitlement, because it happened in a SDA.  Then a few years later, they fall during a field exercise, and damage the kneecap in the same knee. It would still be granted 5/5, but they could look at it, and say that it is impossible to determine what symptoms, such as reduced range of motion, or pain, is strictly because of the first injury, the second injury, or both injuries combined. So therefore the second claim could be reduced, because the symptoms, which are used to determine the level of assessment, are indistinguishable from the first claim.
...and that is where my confuse/argument with VAC arises,


Last edited by Artie Simm on Mon 18 Jun 2018, 08:30; edited 1 time in total
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Re: assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

Post by bigrex on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 00:14

I think the best way I can explain it, would be using a knee injury, or more specific, multiple knee injuries, as an example. First injury, a veteran tears their MCL in Afghanistan, and requires surgery. it would be granted full entitlement, because it happened in a SDA. Then a few years later, they fall during a field exercise, and damage the kneecap in the same knee. It would still be granted 5/5, but they could look at it, and say that it is impossible to determine what symptoms, such as reduced range of motion, or pain, is strictly because of the first injury, the second injury, or both injuries combined. So therefore the second claim could be reduced, because the symptoms, which are used to determine the level of assessment, are indistinguishable from the first claim.
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assessment worksheet - partially contributing table

Post by Artie Simm on Fri 15 Jun 2018, 21:51

So I sent for a copy of my disability claim decision, in it, there are Step 1, 2 etc with a numerical rating that add up to % of my disability. However in between these steps is the question in the Step that says " does the Partially Contributing Table apply?".


Last edited by Artie Simm on Mon 18 Jun 2018, 08:28; edited 1 time in total
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